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Research Papers: Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer

Investigation of the Use of an Inorganic Aqueous Solution in Copper-Made Phase-Change Heat Transfer Devices

[+] Author and Article Information
Qi Yao

Mem. ASME
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
University of California,
420 Westwood Plaza, Eng. IV 43-132,
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1957
e-mail: yaoqi1983@ucla.edu

Jacob Supowit

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
University of California,
420 Westwood Plaza,
Eng. IV 43-132,
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1957
e-mail: jake.supowit@gmail.com

Ivan Catton

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
University of California,
420 Westwood Plaza, Eng. IV 43-132,
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1957
e-mail: catton@ucla.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received August 5, 2016; final manuscript received August 21, 2017; published online December 19, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Guihua Tang.

J. Heat Transfer 140(4), 042901 (Dec 19, 2017) (9 pages) Paper No: HT-16-1489; doi: 10.1115/1.4038190 History: Received August 05, 2016; Revised August 21, 2017

A novel inorganic aqueous solution (IAS) is shown to have a better heat transfer performance than water when used as the working fluid in copper-made phase-change heat transfer devices. First, the physical properties of IAS are measured and compared to those of water. Another, a chemical analysis is performed, and the chemical reactions involved between IAS and the copper surface are listed and categorized by their contributions to the heat transfer performance. In addition, a capillary rise test is performed to show how each chemical contributes to the improvement of the surface wettability. Last, using IAS in copper-made phase-change heat transfer devices is discussed, and the main focus is how IAS improves the heat transfer performance by a smaller thermal resistance and a larger critical heat flux. The conclusion is validated by thermo-siphon tests at different inclination angles.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 2

Contact angle test on copper surfaces: (a) clean and smooth, (b) IAS treated, and (c) IAS treated and then rinsed by DI-water

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Fig. 1

(a) Fresh IAS, (b) used IAS, and (c) condensed liquid from the vapor of IAS

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Fig. 3

Chromium (VI) balance in IAS at 25 °C

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Fig. 7

Diagram of how chromate salts deposit on a copper surface pretreated by potassium permanganate

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Fig. 8

Difference between water and IAS while being dried out

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Fig. 11

Performance comparison between water/copper and IAS/copper thermo-siphons at an inclination angle of 90 deg

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Fig. 12

Performance comparison between water/copper and IAS/copper thermo-siphons at an inclination angle of 30 deg

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Fig. 4

Schematic of capillary test

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Fig. 5

Initially wetted region versus coated region

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Fig. 6

Capillary test results: (a) water and smooth surface, (b) IAS yellow and smooth surface, (c) potassium permanganate solution and smooth surface, and (d) IAS yellow and surface pretreated by potassium permanganate solution

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Fig. 9

Schematic diagram of the setup of the thermo-siphon experiment

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Fig. 10

Locations of thermo-couples in thermo-siphon test

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Fig. 13

Performance comparison between water/copper, IAS yellow/copper, and IAS/copper thermo-siphons at an inclination angle of 10 deg

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Fig. 14

Performance comparison between water/copper, IAS yellow/copper, and IAS/copper thermo-siphons at an inclination angle of 20 deg

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Fig. 15

Meniscus regions in vertical IAS/copper and water/copper thermo-siphons, without liquid back flow

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Fig. 16

Working regions of a thermo-siphon

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Fig. 17

Meniscus region in vertical IAS/copper and water/copper thermo-siphons, with liquid back flow

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Fig. 18

Meniscus regions in an inclined thermo-siphon, with liquid back flow

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