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Research Papers: Natural and Mixed Convection

Numerical Simulation of the Effect of Channel Orientation on Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer at High Buoyancy Number in a Rotating Two-Pass Channel With Angled Ribs

[+] Author and Article Information
Berrabah Brahim

Materials and Reactive Systems Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Technology,
Djillali Liabes University,
Sidi Bel-Abbes 22000, Algeria
e-mail: Berrabah_brahim@yahoo.fr

Aminallah Miloud

Materials and Reactive Systems Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Faculty of Technology,
Djillali Liabes University,
Sidi Bel-Abbes 22000, Algeria
e-mail: aminallahm@yahoo.fr

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received September 18, 2017; final manuscript received September 28, 2018; published online December 13, 2018. Assoc. Editor: Amitabh Narain.

J. Heat Transfer 141(2), 022502 (Dec 13, 2018) (12 pages) Paper No: HT-17-1551; doi: 10.1115/1.4041797 History: Received September 18, 2017; Revised September 28, 2018

Convective heat transfer in a rotating two-pass square channel with 45 deg ribs is numerically investigated to simulate turbine blade cooling operation under extreme design cooling conditions (high rotation number, high density ratio, and high buoyancy number). Two channel orientations are examined β = 0 deg and β = 45 deg in order to determine the effects of passage orientation on flow and heat transfer. For a reference pressure of 10-atm and a Reynolds number of 25,000, the results show that at low buoyancy number and for both channel orientations, the combined effect of Coriolis and centrifugal buoyancy forces generates an important thermal gradient between low- and high-pressure surfaces of the first passage, while the second passage remains almost unchanged compared to the stationary cases. At high buoyancy number, and unlike low buoyancy number, the interaction of Coriolis-driven cells, rib-induced vortices, and buoyancy-driven cells are destructive, which degrade the heat transfer rate on trailing and leading surfaces in the first passage for β = 0 deg. In contrast, for β = 45 deg, this interaction is constructive, which enhances the heat transfer rate on co-trailing and co-leading surfaces. In the second passage, the interaction of rib-induced vortices and buoyancy-driven cells deteriorates significantly the heat transfer rate in case of β = 0 deg than in case of β = 45 deg compared to low buoyancy number. The computations are performed using the second-moment closure turbulence model and the numerical results are in fair agreement with available experimental data.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Geometry of two-pass channel investigated experimentally by Johnson et al. [3,6] at low buoyancy number

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Fig. 2

Numerical grid used with velocity contour at inlet and view of grid near the ribs

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Fig. 3

Grid refinement study

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Fig. 4

Predicted and measured [3,6], Nusselt number ratios on trailing (T) surface for β = 0 deg; Re = 25,000, DR = 0.13

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Fig. 5

Predicted and measured [3,6], Nusselt number ratios on co-trailing surface (C-T) for β = 45 deg ; Re = 25,000, DR = 0.13

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Fig. 6

Secondary flow streamlines and temperature contours at s1(s/Dh=6) for cases (1–6): (a) case 1, (b) case 2, (c) case 3, (d) case 4, (e) case 5, and (f) case 6

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Fig. 7

Secondary flow streamlines and temperature contours at s2(s/Dh=8) for cases (1–6): (a) case 1, (b) case 2, (c) case 3, (d) case 4, (e) case 5, and (f) case 6

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Fig. 8

Secondary flow streamlines and temperature contours at s3(s/Dh = 14) for cases (1–6): (a) case 1, (b) case 2, (c) case 3, (d) case 4, (e) case 5, and (f) case 6

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Fig. 9

Secondary flow streamlines and temperature contours at s4(s/Dh = 16.97) for cases (1–6): (a) case 1, (b) case 2, (c) case 3, (d) case 4, (e) case 5, and (f) case 6

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Fig. 10

Secondary flow streamlines and temperature contours at s5(s/Dh = 19.5) for cases (1–6): (a) case 1, (b) case 2, (c) case 3, (d) case 4, (e) case 5, and (f) case 6

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Fig. 11

Secondary flow streamlines and temperature contours at s6(s/Dh = 25.4) for cases (1–6): (a) case 1, (b) case 2, (c) case 3, (d) case 4, (e) case 5, and (f) case 6

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Fig. 12

Secondary flow streamlines and temperature contours at s7(s/Dh = 31) for cases (1–6): (a) case 1, (b) case 2, (c) case 3, (d) case 4, (e) case 5, and (f) case 6

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Fig. 13

Streamlines and temperature contours along the midplane for case 1 and along the diagonal plane for case 2: (a) case 1 (β = 0 deg, b0 = 0) and (b) case 2 (β = 45 deg, b0 = 0)

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Fig. 14

Streamlines and temperature contours along the midplane for case 3 and along the diagonal plane for case 4: (a) case 3 (β = 0 deg, b0 = 0.3) and (b) case 4 (β = 45 deg, b0 = 0.3)

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Fig. 15

Streamlines and temperature contours along the midplane for case 5 and along the diagonal plane for case 6: (a) case 5 (β = 0 deg, b0 = 20.5) and (b) case 6 (β = 45 deg, b0 = 20.5)

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Fig. 16

Distribution of local Nusselt number ratio on trailing and co-trailing surface for cases 1–6: (a) trailing surface (case 1: β = 0 deg, R0 = 0 and Δρ/ρ = 0.13), (b) co-trailing surface (case 2: β = 45 deg, R0 = 0 and Δρ/ρ = 0.13), (c) trailing surface (case 3: β = 0 deg, R0 = 0.24 and Δρ/ρ = 0.13), (d) co-trailing surface (case 4: β = 45 deg, R0 = 0.24 and Δρ/ρ = 0.13), (e) trailing surface (case 5: β = 0 deg, R0 = 1 and Δρ/ρ = 0.5), and (f) co-trailing surface (case 6: β = 45 deg, R0 = 1 and Δρ/ρ = 0.5)

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Fig. 17

Distribution of local Nusselt number ratio on leading and co-leading surface for cases 1–6: (a) leading surface (case 1: β = 0 deg, R0 = 0 and Δρ/ρ = 0.13), (b) co-leading surface (case 2: β = 45 deg, R0 = 0 and Δρ/ρ = 0.13), (c) leading surface (case 3: β = 0 deg, R0 = 0.24 and Δρ/ρ = 0.13), (d) co-leading surface (case 4: β = 45 deg, R0 = 0.24 and Δρ/ρ = 0.13), (e) leading surface (case 5: β = 0 deg, R0 = 1 and Δρ/ρ = 0.5), and (f) co-leading surface (case 6: β = 45 deg, R0 = 1 and Δρ/ρ = 0.5)

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Fig. 18

Effect of passage orientation on heat transfer ratio at high buoyancy number: (a) β = 0 deg trailing (T) and β = 45 deg co-trailing (C-T) and (b) β = 0 deg leading (T) and β = 45 deg co-leading (C-L)

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