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RESEARCH PAPERS

Boiling Burnout During Crossflow over Cylinders, beyond the Influence of Gravity

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Z. Hasan

School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif.; Boiling and Phase Change Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506

M. M. Hasan, R. Eichhorn

Boiling and Phase Change Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506

J. H. Lienhard

Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Houston, Houston, Tex. 77004; Boiling and Phase Change Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506

J. Heat Transfer 103(3), 478-484 (Aug 01, 1981) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3244489 History: Received July 24, 1980; Online October 20, 2009

Abstract

New observations of burnout during the upflow and downflow of isopropanol and methanol over horizontal cylinders are added to previous observations. A criterion is developed to determine whether or not gravity influences burnout in any such flow. A prediction that depends on one empirical constant is then developed to predict burnout when gravity is not influential. Those of the existing data that are uninfluenced by gravity are represented within ± 20 percent by the prediction. It is also shown that a low-speed downflow can cause the hydrodynamic burnout to be replaced with a very inefficient buoyancy burnout mechanism.

Copyright © 1981 by ASME
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