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RESEARCH PAPERS: Radiative Transfer

Dependent Scattering Properties of Woven Fibrous Insulations for Normal Incidence

[+] Author and Article Information
Sunil Kumar

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnic University, 333 Jay Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201

S. M. White

Thermal Protection Materials Branch, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035

J. Heat Transfer 117(1), 160-166 (Feb 01, 1995) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2822297 History: Received June 01, 1993; Revised April 01, 1994; Online December 05, 2007

Abstract

The scattering properties of woven fibrous materials are examined in this paper and a simple model is presented to account for the interactions between the scattered radiation from different individual fibers. The case of a normally incident plane electromagnetic wave is considered. Fiber sizes in the Rayleigh regime are considered for developing closed-form solutions. Previous studies in the literature that have addressed the scattering properties of fibrous materials have mostly ignored the effect of constructive or destructive addition of scattered waves from individual fibers, the exception being the case of parallel fibers. The difference in the effects of interference on scattering properties of parallel fibers and of woven fabrics arises from the additional interaction of radiation scattered from mutually perpendicular fibers in the latter case, which further complicates the analysis.

Copyright © 1995 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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