0
RESEARCH PAPERS: Heat Pipes

Effects of Gravity on Rewetting of Capillary Groove Surface at Elevated Temperatures—Experimental and Theoretical Studies

[+] Author and Article Information
S. H. Chan, J. D. Blake, T. R. Shen, Y. G. Zhao

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201

J. Heat Transfer 117(4), 1042-1047 (Nov 01, 1995) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2836279 History: Received November 01, 1994; Revised April 01, 1995; Online January 23, 2008

Abstract

Theoretical and experimental investigations of the rewetting characteristics of thin liquid films over heated and unheated capillary grooved plates were performed. To investigate the effect of gravity on rewetting, the grooved surface was placed in upward and downward-facing positions. Profound gravitational effects were observed as the rewetting velocity was found to be higher in the upward than in the downward-facing orientation. The difference was even greater with higher initial plate temperatures. With either orientation, it was found that the rewetting velocity increased with the initial plate temperature. But when the temperature was raised above a rewetting temperature, the rewetting velocity decreased with the initial plate temperature. Hydrodynamically controlled and heat conduction controlled rewetting models were then presented to explain and to predict the rewetting characteristics in these two distinct regions. The predicted rewetting velocities were found to be in good agreement with experimental data with elevated plate temperatures.

Copyright © 1995 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In