0
RESEARCH PAPERS: Forced Convection

Direct Numerical Simulation of Unstably Stratified Turbulent Channel Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
O. Iida, N. Kasagi

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan

J. Heat Transfer 119(1), 53-61 (Feb 01, 1997) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2824100 History: Received January 16, 1996; Revised November 14, 1996; Online December 05, 2007

Abstract

Direct numerical simulations of the fully developed horizontal channel flow under unstable density stratification were carried out to investigate interactive shear and buoyancy effects on the turbulent momentum and heat transport. As the Grashof number is increased, buoyant thermal plumes are generated. The large-scale thermal convection involving the thermal plumes diminishes the quasi-coherent streamwise vortices, which are known to play a major role in the transport mechanism of near-wall turbulence. The destruction of the streamwise vortices result in the increased bulk mean velocity and the decreased turbulent friction coefficient. The vertical fluid motion of thermal plumes drastically changes the transport mechanism of the Reynolds shear stress. The thermal plumes are spatially aligned in the streamwise direction, and the low-speed streaks and vortical structures are concentrated in the region where the thermal plume starts to rise. The Prandtl number effects on the turbulent kinetic energy are also studied when the thermal plumes emerge.

Copyright © 1997 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In