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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Natural and Mixed Convection

Heat Transfer From an Isothermal Vertical Surface With Adjacent Heated Horizontal Louvers: Numerical Analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Collins

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3G1

S. J. Harrison, P. H. Oosthuizen

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L 3N6

D. Naylor

Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5B 2K3

J. Heat Transfer 124(6), 1072-1077 (Dec 03, 2002) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1481357 History: Received June 18, 2001; Revised March 07, 2002; Online December 03, 2002
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
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References

Machin,  A. D., Naylor,  D., Oosthuizen,  P. H., and Harrison,  S. J., 1998, “Experimental Study of Free Convection at an Indoor Glazing Surface with a Venetian Blind,” Journal of HVAC&R Research, 4(2), pp. 153–166.
Ye,  P., Harrison,  S. J., Oosthuizen,  P. H., and Naylor,  D., 1999, “Convective Heat Transfer from a Window with Venetian Blind: Detailed Modeling,” ASHRAE J., 105(2), pp. 1031–1037.
Phillips, J., Naylor, D., Oosthuizen, P. H., and Harrison, S. J., 2000, “Modeling of the Conjugate Heat Transfer from a Window Adjacent to a Louvered Shade,” Sixth International Conference on Advanced Computational Methods in Heat Transfer, Madrid, Spain, pp. 127–136.
Klems, J. H., and Warner, J. L., 1992, “A New Method for Predicting the Solar Heat Gain Coefficient of Complex Fenestration Systems,” Thermal Performance of the Exterior Envelope of Buildings Conference V, Clearwater Beach, FL.
Wright, J. L., 1992, “Glazing System Thermal Analysis,” CANMET, Advanced Glazing System Laboratory, VISION3, Minister of Supply and Services Canada, University of Waterloo, 1992.
Finlayson, E. U., Arasteh, D. K., Huizenga, C., Rubin, M. D., and Reilly, M. S., 1993, “WINDOW 4.0: Documentation of Calculation Procedures,” Energy and Environmental Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.
Touloukian, Y. S., Liley, P. E., and Saxena, S. C., 1970, “Thermal Conductivity: Nonmetallic Liquids and Gases,” Thermophysical Properties of Matter, 3 , Thermophysical Properties Research Center (TPRC), Purdue University, Plenum Publishing, New York.
Touloukian, Y. S., and Makita, T., 1970, “Specific Heat: Nonmetallic Liquids and Gases,” Thermophysical Properties of Matter, 6 , Thermophysical Properties Research Center (TPRC), Purdue University, Plenum Publishing, New York.
Touloukian, Y. S., Saxena, S. C., and Hestermans, P. 1975, “Viscosity: Nonmetallic Liquids and Gases,” Thermophysical Properties of Matter, 11 , Thermophysical Properties Research Center (TPRC), Purdue University, Plenum Publishing, New York.
Siegel, R., and Howell, J. R., 1970, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, McGraw-Hill, Toronto.
Fluent, 1999, “FIDAP 8 Documentation Suite,” Fluent Inc.
Ostrach, S., 1953, “An Analysis of Laminar Free-Convection Flow and Heat Transfer about a Flat Plate Parallel to the Direction of the Generating Body Force,” NACA Technical Report 1111.
Collins, M., Harrison, S. J., Oosthuizen, P. H., and Naylor, D., 2002, “Heat Transfer from an Isothermal Vertical Surface with Adjacent Heated Horizontal Louvers: Validation,” Submitted for publication to ASME Journal of Heat Transfer.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
System geometry (left), computational domain (mid) and photo (right)
Grahic Jump Location
Convective and radiative heat flux for validation case 1: b=15.4 mm,ϕ=0 deg,Tp=283 K. The solid and dotted lines represent radiative and convective heat transfer respectively. Slat positions are superimposed on graphs for clarity.
Grahic Jump Location
Convective and radiative heat flux for validation case 2: b=15.4 mm,ϕ=0 deg,Tp=298 K. The solid and dotted lines represent radiative and convective heat transfer respectively. Slat positions are superimposed on graphs for clarity.
Grahic Jump Location
Convective and radiative heat flux for validation case 3: b=20.0 mm,ϕ=0 deg,Tp=283 K. The solid and dotted lines represent radiative and convective heat transfer respectively. Slat positions are superimposed on graphs for clarity.
Grahic Jump Location
Convective and radiative heat flux for validation case 4: b=20.0 mm,ϕ=0 deg,Tp=298 K. The solid and dotted lines represent radiative and convective heat transfer respectively. Slat positions are superimposed on graphs for clarity.
Grahic Jump Location
Convective and radiative heat flux for validation case 5: b=15.4 mm,ϕ=45 deg,Tp=283 K. The solid and dotted lines represent radiative and convective heat transfer respectively. Slat positions are superimposed on graphs for clarity.
Grahic Jump Location
Convective and radiative heat flux for validation case 6: b=15.4 mm,ϕ=45 deg,Tp=298 K. The solid and dotted lines represent radiative and convective heat transfer respectively. Slat positions are superimposed on graphs for clarity.
Grahic Jump Location
Convective and radiative heat flux for validation case 7: b=15.4 mm,ϕ=−45 deg,Tp=283 K. The solid and dotted lines represent radiative and convective heat transfer respectively. Slat positions are superimposed on graphs for clarity.
Grahic Jump Location
Convective and radiative heat flux for validation case 8: b=15.4 mm,ϕ=−45 deg,Tp=298 K. The solid and dotted lines represent radiative and convective heat transfer respectively. Slat positions are superimposed on graphs for clarity.

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