0
TECHNICAL PAPERS: Thermal Systems

Maximum Attainable Performance of Stirling Engines and Refrigerators

[+] Author and Article Information
P. C. T. de Boer

Upson Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853

J. Heat Transfer 125(5), 911-915 (Sep 23, 2003) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1597618 History: Received August 26, 2002; Revised April 01, 2003; Online September 23, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Walker, G., 1980, Stirling Engines, Clarendon Press, Oxford, UK.
Organ, A. J., 1997, The Regenerator and the Stirling Engine, Mechanical Engineering Publications Limited, London and Bury St. Edmunds, UK (Section 3.9).
Schmidt, G., 1871, “Theorie der Lehrmanschen Calorischen Maschine,” Z. Ver. Dtsch. Ing., 15 (1), pp. 1–12, 15 (2), pp. 97–112.
Reader, G. T., and Hooper, C., 1983, Stirling Engines, E. & F. N. Spon, London and New York (Appendix A).
Finkelstein, T., 1960, “Generalized Thermodynamic Analysis of Stirling Engines,” SAE Paper 118 B.
Urieli, I., and Berchowitz, D. M., 1984, Stirling Cycle Analysis, Adam Hilger Ltd., Bristol, UK.
Walker, G., and Senft, J. R., 1985, Free Piston Stirling Engines, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Germany.
West, C. D., 1986, Principles and Applications of Stirling Engines, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York, NY.
Hargreaves, C. M., 1991, The Philips Stirling Engine, Elsevier Science Publishers, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Organ, A. J., 1992, Thermodynamics and Gas Dynamics of the Stirling Cycle Machine, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.
Senft, J. R., 1993, Ringborn Stirling Engines, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.
Finkelstein, T., and Organ, A. J., 2001, Air Engines, the History, Science and Reality of the Perfect Engine, The American Society of Mechanical Engineers, New York, NY.
de Boer,  P. C. T., 2002, “Maximum Attainable Performance of Pulse Tube Refrigerators,” Cryogenics, 42, pp. 123–125.
de Waele,  A. T. A. M., Steijaart,  P. P., and Koning,  J. J., 1998, “Thermodynamic Aspects of Pulse Tubes II,” Cryogenics, 38, pp. 329–335.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Sketch of model used for Stirling engine. The high temperature space is the expansion space, the low temperature one is the compression space.
Grahic Jump Location
Nondimensional power output P and thermal efficiency η/ηCarnot as function of ratio of pressure amplitudes πc. Solid curves are for cos(δ)=1, dotted curves for cos(δ)=0.9.
Grahic Jump Location
Nondimensional power outputs PCarnot and P as function of ratio of pressure amplitudes πc. Solid curves are for cos(δ)=1, dotted curves for cos(δ)=0.9.
Grahic Jump Location
Sketch of model used for Stirling refrigerator
Grahic Jump Location
Nondimensional cooling rate 〈Ḣc〉Th/Tc and coefficient of performance COP/COPCarnot as function of ratio of pressure amplitudes πc. Solid curves are for cos(δ)=1, dotted curves for cos(δ)=0.9.
Grahic Jump Location
Nondimensional power inputs 〈Ḣh〉−〈Ḣc〉 and (Th/Tc−1)〈Ḣc〉 as function of ratio of pressure amplitudes πc. Solid curves are for cos(δ)=1, dotted curves for cos(δ)=0.9.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In