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TECHNICAL PAPERS: Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer

Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Heat Transfer Across a Mobile, Sheared Gas-Liquid Interface

[+] Author and Article Information
D. Lakehal, M. Fulgosi, G. Yadigaroglu

Institute of Energy Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH-Zentrum/CLT, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland

S. Banerjee

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA

J. Heat Transfer 125(6), 1129-1139 (Nov 19, 2003) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1621891 History: Received July 17, 2002; Revised June 18, 2003; Online November 19, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

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Fulgosi,  M., Lakehal,  D., Banerjee,  S., and De Angelis,  V., 2003, “Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulence in a Sheared Air-Water Flow With Deformable Interface,” J. Fluid Mech., 482, p. 319.
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Figures

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Geometry of the simulated two-phase flow
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Energy spectra at z+=5 for the velocity components, in the gas phase: (a) streamwise direction; and (b) spanwise direction.
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Saturation spectra of the wave fields at the beginning (Bin) and at the end (Bout) of the sampling period
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Mean temperature profiles. (a) Comparison with other DNS databases. Lines are used to identify the present DNS result: –, Pr=1; [[dashed_line]], Pr=5; -⋅-⋅-, Pr=10. Symbols identify respectively: +, Pr=1 and ×, Pr=5: DNS of Kawamura et al. 5; ○, Pr=1 and □, Pr=5: DNS of Tiselj et al. 21; ▵, Pr=10: DNS of Na et al. 7. (b) Present DNS extrapolated data; lines are used to identify present DNS results and symbols to identify the fitting equations.
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Root mean square value of temperature fluctuations. Lines are used to identify the present DNS result: –, Pr=1; [[dashed_line]], Pr=5; -⋅-⋅-, Pr=10. Symbols identify respectively: +, Pr=1 and ×, Pr=5: DNS of Kawamura et al. 5; ○, Pr=1 and □, Pr=5: DNS of Tiselj et al. 21; ▵, Pr=10: DNS of Na et al. 7.
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Streamwise turbulent heat flux and comparison with Kawamura et al. 5
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Interface-normal turbulent heat flux: (a) boundary layer; and (b) near interface/wall region and comparison with Kawamura et al. 5.
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Heat transfer coefficient
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The elevation of the waves is amplified by factor 10: (a) u+ at z+=12; (b) interfacial Shear Stress; (c) θ+ at z+=12, Pr=1; (d) interfacial HTC, Pr=1; (e) θ+ at z+=12, Pr=5; (f) interfacial HTC, Pr=5; (g) θ+ at z+=12, Pr=10; and (h) interfacial HTC, Pr=10.
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Budget for the temperature variance in the near interface/wall region. Lines are used to identify the results of the present DNS and symbols to identify the wall-bounded DNS results of Kawamura et al. 5. (a) Pr=1; (b) Pr=5; (c) Pr=10.
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Budget for the vertical turbulent heat flux in the near interface/wall region. Lines are used to identify the results of the present DNS and symbols to identify the wall-bounded DNS results of Kawamura et al. 5. (a) Pr=1; (b) Pr=5; (c) Pr=10.
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(a) Turbulent diffusivity; and (b) Turbulent diffusivity in the vicinity of the deformable interface.

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