0
TECHNICAL PAPERS: Evaporation, Boiling, and Condensation

Modeling and Numerical Prediction of Flow Boiling in a Thin Geometry

[+] Author and Article Information
Ranganathan Kumar

University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816

Charles C. Maneri, T. Darton Strayer

Lockheed Martin Corporation, Schenectady, NY 12301

J. Heat Transfer 126(1), 22-33 (Mar 10, 2004) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1643754 History: Received November 20, 2002; Revised October 16, 2003; Online March 10, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Drew, D. A., 1992, “Analytical Modeling of Multiphase Flows,” Boiling Heat Transfer, R. T. Lahey, ed., Elsevier, pp. 31–84.
Lahey,  R. T., and Drew,  D. A., 2001, “The Analysis of Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer Using a Multidimensional, Four Field, Two-Fluid Model,” Nucl. Eng. Des., 204, pp. 29–44.
Lahey, R. T., 1996, A CFD Analysis of Multidimensional Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer Phenomena: Process, Enhanced and Multiphase Heat Transfer (A. E. Bergles-Festschrift), Begell House, Inc., New York.
Serizawa, A., 1974, “Fluid Dynamic Characteristics of Two-Phase Flow,” Ph.D. thesis, Kyoto University, Japan.
Tomiyama, A., 1998, “Struggle with Computation Bubble Dynamics,” Proc. of the Int. Conf. on Multiphase Flow, ICMF’98, Lyon, June 8–12, pp. 1–18.
Kumar,  R., Trabold,  T. A., and Maneri,  C. C., 2003, “Experiments and Modeling in Bubbly Flows at Elevated Pressures,” ASME J. Fluids Eng., 125, pp. 469–478.
Hosler,  E. R., 1968, “Flow Patterns in High Pressure Two-Phase (Steam-Water) Flow with Heat Addition,” AIChE Symp. Ser., 64, pp. 54–66.
Drew, D. A., and Passman, S. L., 1998, Theory of Multicomponent Fluids, Springer-Verlag, New York.
Patankar, S. V., 1980, Numerical Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow, Hemisphere Publishing Inc., NY.
Rhie,  C. M., and Chow,  W. L., 1983, “Numerical Study of the Turbulent Flow Past and Airfoil with Trailing Edge Separation,” AIAA J., 21(11), pp. 1525–1532.
Spalding, D. B., 1980, “Mathematical Methods in Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics,” Proceeding of ANS Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics, R. T. Lahey, ed., pp. 1979–2023.
FLOW3D Release 3.2 User’s Manual, 1992, Computational Fluid Dynamics Services, AEA Industrial Technology, Harwell Laboratory, Oxford, UK.
Kurul, N., 1990, “Multidimensional Effects in Two-Phase Flow Including Phase Change,” Ph.D. thesis, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
Del Valle,  M. V. H., and Kenning,  D. B. R., 1985, “Subcooled Flow Boiling at High Heat Flux,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 28, pp. 1907–1920.
Ceumern-Lindenstjerna, W. C., 1977, “Bubble Departure and Release Frequencies During Nucleate Pool Boiling of Water and Aqueous NaCl Solutions,” Heat Transfer in Boiling, Academic Press and Hemisphere.
Davis,  E. J., and Anderson,  G. H., 1966, “The Incipience of Nucleate Boiling in Forced Convection Flow,” AIChE J., 12, pp. 774–780.
Ranz,  W. E., and Marshall,  W. R., 1952, Chem. Eng. Prog., 48, pp. 141–146.
Mendelson,  H. D., 1967, “The Prediction of Bubble Terminal Velocities from Wave Theory,” AIChE J., 13, pp. 250–253.
Ishii,  M., and Zuber,  N., 1979, “Drag Coefficient and Relative Velocity in Bubbly, Droplet or Particulate Flows,” AIChE J., 25, pp. 843–855.
Drew,  D. A., and Lahey,  R. T., 1987, “The Virtual Mass and Lift force on a Sphere in Rotating and Straining Inviscid Flow,” Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 13(1), pp. 113–121.
Zun, I., 1987, “Transition from Wall Void Peaking to Core Void Peaking in Turbulent Bubbly Flow,” Proc. ICHMT Conf. on Transport Phenomena in Multiphase Flow, Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia.
Levy,  S., 1967, “Forced Convection Subcooled Boiling-Prediction of Vapor Volumetric Fractions,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 10, pp. 951–965.
Tolubinsky, V. I., and Kostanchuk, D. M., 1970, “Vapor Bubbles Growth Rate and Heat Transfer Intensity at Subcooled Water Boiling,” Fourth Int. Heat Transf. Conf., Paris-Versailles, 5 , p. 132.8.
Maneri, C. C., 1970, “The Motion of Plane Bubbles in Inclined Ducts,” Ph.D. thesis, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, Brooklyn, NY.
Antal,  S. P., Lahey,  R. T., and Flaherty,  J. E., 1991, “Analysis of Phase Distribution in Fully Developed Laminar Bubbly Two-Phase Flow,” Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 17, pp. 635–652.
Lopez de Bertodano, M., 1992, “Turbulent Bubbly Two Phase Flow in a Triangular Duct,” Ph.D. thesis, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY.
Marie,  J. L., 1987, “Modeling of the Skin Friction and Heat Transfer in Turbulent Two-Component Bubbly Flow in Pipes,” Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 113, pp. 309–325.
Sato,  Y., Sadatomi,  M., and Sekoguchi,  K., 1981, “Momentum and Heat Transfer in Two-Phase Bubble Flow,” Parts I and II. Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 7, pp. 167–190.
Kirouac, G. J., Trabold, T. A., Vassallo, P. F., Moore, W. E., and Kumar, R., 1999, “Instrumentation Development in Two-Phase flow,” Exp. Thermal Science, 20 , pp. 79–93.
Haberman, W. L., and Morton, R. K., 1953, “An Experimental Investigation of the Drag and Shape of Air Bubbles Rising in Various Liquids,” David Taylor Model Basin Report 802.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Flow geometry and heat partitioning representation at the wall (figure not drawn to scale)
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison plots for Case 1: 266 kg/hr; 2.4 MPa; 6.03 kW; 33.2°C subcooling: (a) Comparison of predicted cross section average void fraction with GDS measurement; (b) Comparison of predicted line-average void distribution in narrow dimension with GDS measurement at different x/l; and (c) Comparison of predicted and measured incremental pressure drop. Solid lines and symbols represent predictions and measurements, respectively. Boxed numbers represent x/l.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison plots for Case 2: 106 kg/hr; 1.4 MPa; 1.082 kW; 25.8°C subcooling: (a) Comparison of predicted cross section average void with GDS measurement; (b) Predicted line-average void distribution in narrow dimension at different x/l (no GDS data available); (c) Comparison of predicted and local void in narrow dimension with HFA measurement at different x/l; and (d) Comparison of predicted and measured incremental pressure. Note that solid lines and symbols represent predictions and measurements, respectively. Boxed numbers represent x/l.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison plots for Case 3: 532 kg/hr; 1.4 MPa; 2.647 kW; 3.6°C subcooling: (a) Comparison of predicted cross section average void fraction with GDS measurements; (b), (c) Comparison of predicted line-averaged void in y with GDS measurements; (d) Comparison of predicted local void distribution in y with HFA measurements; and (e) Comparison of predicted and measured incremental pressure drop. Solid lines and symbols represent predictions and measurements respectively. Boxed numbers represent x/l.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison plots for Case 4: 532 kg/hr; 1.4 MPa; 5.062 kW; 3.6°C subcooling: (a) Comparison of predicted cross section average void fraction with GDS measurements; (b) and (c) Comparison of predicted line-averaged void in y with GDS measurements; and (d) Comparison of predicted and measured local void fraction using HFA. Solid lines and symbols represent predictions and measurement respectively. Boxed numbers represent x/l.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison plots for Case 5: 266 kg/hr; 2.4 MPa; 2.964 kW; 7.0°C subcooling: (a) Comparison of predicted cross section average void fraction with GDS measurement; (b) and (c) Comparison of predicted average void distribution in narrow dimension with GDS measurement. Solid lines and symbols represent predictions and measurements respectively. Boxed numbers represent x/l.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison plots for case 6: 532 kg/hr; 2.4 MPa; 5.722 kW; 2.1°C subcooling: (a) Comparison of predicted cross section average void fraction with GDS measurement; (b) and (c) Comparison of predicted average void distribution in narrow dimension with GDS measurement. Solid lines and symbols represent predictions and measurements respectively. Boxed numbers represent x/l.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison Plots for case 7: 2128 kg/hr; 2.0 MPa; 20.034 kW; 5.4°C subcooling: (a) Comparison of predicted cross section average void with GDS measurement; (b) and (c) Comparison of predicted line-averaged void fraction with GDS measurement. Solid lines and symbols represent predictions and measurements respectively. Boxed numbers represent x/l.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison plots for case 8: 1064 kg/hr; 1.7 MPa; 9.951 kW; 15.0°C subcooling: (a) Comparison of predicted cross section average void with GDS measurement; Plots (b) and (c) Comparison of predicted line-averaged void fraction with GDS measurement in y (thickness); (d) and (e) Comparison of predicted line-averaged void fraction with GDS measurements in width dimension; and (f ) Comparison of predicted and incremental pressure drop. Solid lines and symbols represent predictions and measurements, respectively. Boxed numbers represent x/l.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison plots for case 9: 318 kg/hr; 2.4 MPa; 3.382 kW; 8.3°C subcooling: (a) Comparison of predicted cross section average void with GDS measurement; (b) Comparison of predicted line-averaged void fraction with GDS measurement in y (thickness); (c) and (d) Comparison of predicted line-averaged void fraction with GDS measurements in z (width); and (e) Comparison of predicted and incremental pressure drop. Solid lines and symbols represent predictions and measurements respectively. Boxed numbers represent x/l.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison plots for case 10: 366 kg/hr; 2.4 MPa; 6.601 kW; 26.3°C subcooling: (a) Comparison of predicted cross section average void with GDS measurement; (b) and (c) Comparison of predicted line-averaged void fraction with GDS measurement in y (thickness); (d) and (e) Comparison of predicted line-averaged void fraction with GDS measurements in z (width); and (f ) Comparison of predicted and incremental pressure drop. Solid lines and symbols represent predictions and measurements respectively. Boxed numbers represent x/l.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In