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RESEARCH PAPER

A Two-Temperature Model for the Analysis of Passive Thermal Control Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
Shankar Krishnan, Jayathi Y. Murthy, Suresh V. Garimella

Cooling Technologies Research Center, School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088

J. Heat Transfer 126(4), 628-637 (Mar 24, 2004) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1773194 History: Received June 02, 2003; Revised March 24, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Schematic diagram of the problem considered
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of the present work (×) with experimental and numerical predictions of Beckermann and Viskanta 20
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of the predicted temperature difference between solid and fluid phases (×) with the numerical predictions of Mohammed 18 (○) at η=0.25 for Pr=1 and thermal conductivity ratio=1.0
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of the predicted temperature difference between solid and fluid phases (×) with the numerical predictions of Mohammed 18 (○) at η=0.5 for Pr=1 and thermal conductivity ratio=1.0
Grahic Jump Location
Spatial variation of solid and fluid temperature distribution for zero inter-phase heat transfer coefficient (Nuf=0). For all Rayleigh numbers the solid temperature distribution is a straight line.
Grahic Jump Location
Predicted temperature variation at steady-state for various Rayleigh numbers at the mid-height of the domain (η=0.5): (a) solid-to-fluid temperature difference, and (b) solid (broken line) and fluid (solid lines with symbols) temperature distributions
Grahic Jump Location
Predicted temporal evolution of thermal field for Ra=106,Nuf=0, Pr=1, and Da=10−2 at the mid-height of the domain (η=0.5): (a) solid-to-fluid temperature difference, and (b) solid (broken line) and fluid (solid lines with symbols) temperature distribution. Solid (broken line) reaches a steady state very fast.
Grahic Jump Location
Predicted temporal evolution of thermal field for Ra=108,Nuf=0, Pr=1, and Da=10−2 at the mid-height of the domain (η=0.5): (a) solid-to-fluid temperature difference, and (b) solid (broken line) and fluid (solid lines with symbols) temperature distribution. Solid (broken line) reaches a steady state very fast.
Grahic Jump Location
Predicted temporal evolution of thermal field for Ra=106,Nuf≠0, Pr=1, and Da=10−2 at the mid-height of the domain (η=0.5): (a) solid-to-fluid temperature difference, and (b) solid (broken line) and fluid (solid lines with symbols) temperature distribution
Grahic Jump Location
Predicted temporal evolution of thermal field for Ra=108,Nuf≠0, Pr=1, and Da=10−2 at the mid-height of the domain (η=0.5): (a) solid-to-fluid temperature difference, and (b) solid (broken line) and fluid (solid lines with symbols) temperature distribution
Grahic Jump Location
Predicted temporal evolution of thermal field for Ra=108,Nuf≠0, Pr=100, and Da=10−2 at the mid-height of the domain (η=0.5): (a) solid-to-fluid temperature difference, and (b) solid (broken line) and fluid (solid lines with symbols) temperature distribution
Grahic Jump Location
Predicted temporal evolution of solid-to-fluid temperature difference at the mid-height of the domain (η=0.5) for Ra=108,Nuf≠0, Pr=1, and Da=10−3

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