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RESEARCH PAPER

Calculation of Turbulent Boundary Layers Using Equilibrium Thermal Wakes

[+] Author and Article Information
James Sucec

University of Maine, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 5711 Boardman Hall, Room 202, Orono, ME 04469

J. Heat Transfer 127(2), 159-164 (Mar 15, 2005) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1844538 History: Received June 03, 2004; Revised November 02, 2004; Online March 15, 2005
Copyright © 2005 by ASME
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References

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Kader,  B. A., 1981, “Temperature and Concentration Profiles in Fully Turbulent Boundary Layers,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 24, pp. 1541–1544.
Kader,  B. A., 1991, “Heat and Mass Transfer in Pressure Gradient Boundary Layers,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 34, pp. 2837–2857.
Subramanian,  C. S., and Antonia,  R. A., 1981, “Effect of Reynolds Number on a Slightly Heated Turbulent Boundary Layer,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 24, pp. 1833–1846.
Fridman, E., 1997, “Heat Transfer and Temperature Distribution in a Turbulent Flow Over a Flat Plate With an Unheated Starting Length,” HTD—Vol. 346, Proceedings of the 1997 National Heat Transfer Conference, 8 , pp. 127–132.
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Bell, D. M., and Ferziger, J. H., 1993, “Turbulent Boundary Layer DNS With Passive Scalars,” Near-Wall Turbulent Flows, edited by So, R. M. C., Speziale, C. G., and Launder, B. E., pp. 327–336.
Mellor,  G. L., and Gibson,  D. M., 1966, “Equilibrium Turbulent Boundary Layers,” J. Fluid Mech., 24, pp. 255–274.
Das,  D. K., and White,  F. M., 1986, “Integral Skin Friction Prediction for Turbulent, Separated Flows,” ASME J. Fluids Eng., 108, pp. 476–482.
Sucec,  J., and Oljaca,  M., 1995, “Calculation of Turbulent Boundary Layers With Transpiration and Pressure Gradient Effects,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 38, pp. 2855–2862.
Blackwell, B. F., 1972, “The Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Porous Plate: An Experimental Study of the Heat Transfer Behavior With Adverse Pressure Gradients,” Ph.D. thesis, Stanford University, Stanford California.
Orlando, A. F., Moffat, R. J., and Kays, W. M., 1974, “Turbulent Transport of Heat and Momentum in a Boundary Layer Subject to Deceleration, Suction and Variable Wall Temperature,” Thermosciences Division Report No. HMT-17, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
Sucec,  J., and Lu,  Y., 1990, “Heat Transfer Across Turbulent Boundary Layers With Pressure Gradient,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 112, pp. 906–912.
Kays, W. M., and Crawford, M. E., 1993, Convective Heat and Mass Transfer, 3rd ed., McGraw–Hill, New York, pp. 278–284.
Taylor, R. P., Love, P. H., Coleman, H. W., and Hosni, M. H., 1989, “The Effect of Step Changes in the Thermal Boundary Condition on Heat Transfer in the Incompressible Flat Plate Turbulent Boundary Layer,” HTD-Vol. 107, in Proceedings of the 1989 National Heat Transfer Conference, pp. 9–16.
Kong,  H., Choi,  H., and Sik Lee,  J., 2000, “Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Thermal Boundary Layers,” Phys. Fluids, 12, pp. 2555–2568.
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Predicted thermal wake strength, Πt, variation with Prt and β
Grahic Jump Location
Predictions and experimental data for constant us and isothermal surface. Data, ○, predictions —. Upper curve data, Moffat and Kays 18. Lower curves’ data, Blackwell 12. L=2.286 m (7.5 ft.).
Grahic Jump Location
Predictions —, and data ○, for constant us and constant flux. Nondimensional unheated lengths of 0.0, 0.35, and 0.65 bottom curves, 0.15 top curve. Data from Taylor et al. 16. L=2.00 m.
Grahic Jump Location
Predictions —, and data ○, for constant us and isothermal surface. Nondimensional unheated lengths of 0.25, 0.40, and 0.65, lower half, and 0.0, 0.35, and 0.65 upper half. Bottom curves’ Reynolds numbers twice as large as for upper curves. Data from Taylor et al. 16. L=2.00 m.
Grahic Jump Location
Predictions —, and data ○, for constant us and constant flux. Nondimensional unheated lengths of 0.0, 0.25, and 0.65, upper half. Lower figure has 0.0 unheated length and calculations start at X=0.0. Data from Taylor et al. 16. L=2.00 m.
Grahic Jump Location
Predictions —, and data ○, for isothermal surface. Upper curve has us∼x−0.20. Lower curve has us∼x−0.15. Data from Blackwell 12. L=2.286 m (7.5 ft.).

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