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RESEARCH PAPERS: Electronic Cooling

Optimized Heat Transfer for High Power Electronic Cooling Using Arrays of Microjets

[+] Author and Article Information
Matteo Fabbri

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Henry Samuely School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California, Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095

Vijay K. Dhir

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Henry Samuely School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California, Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095vdhir@seas.ucla.edu

J. Heat Transfer 127(7), 760-769 (Nov 23, 2004) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1924624 History: Received May 23, 2004; Revised November 23, 2004

Electronic cooling has become a subject of interest in recent years due to the rapidly decreasing size of microchips while increasing the amount of heat flux that they must dissipate. Conventional forced air cooling techniques cannot satisfy the cooling requirements and new methods have to be sought. Jet cooling has been used in other industrial fields and has demonstrated the capability of sustaining high heat transfer rates. In this work the heat transfer under arrays of microjets is investigated. Ten different arrays have been tested using deionized water and FC40 as test fluids. The jet diameters employed ranged between 69 and 250μm and the jet Reynolds number varied from 73 to 3813. A maximum surface heat flux of 310Wcm2 was achieved using water jets of 173.6μm diameter and 3mm spacing, impinging at 12.5ms on a circular 19.3mm diameter copper surface. The impinging water temperature was 23.1°C and the surface temperature was 73.9°C. The heat transfer results, consistent with those reported in the literature, have been correlated using only three independent dimensionless parameters. With the use of the correlation developed, an optimal configuration of the main geometrical parameters can be established once the cooling requirements of the electronic component are specified.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 8

Comparison of the Nusselt number predicted by various correlations for Pr=3.6 as a function of Redn (a) s∕dn=6.7, (b) s∕dn=13.3, and (c) s∕dn=26

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Figure 1

Schematic of the experimental setup

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Figure 2

Details of the test section

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Figure 3

Comparison between the heat transfer under arrays of microjets and the results by Oliphant (8) using water

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Figure 4

Comparison of the experimental and predicted Nusselt number

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Figure 5

Variation of Nu with Redn for varying Pr and s∕dn

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Figure 6

Variation of Nu with Pr for varying Redn and s∕dn

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Figure 7

Variation of Nu with s∕dn for varying Redn and Pr

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Figure 10

Effect of orifice plate to heater distance on the heat transfer

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Figure 11

Normalized pressure drop across the orifice plates

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Figure 12

Qpumping as a function of dn for a specific Qremoved∕(Tw−Tjets)

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Figure 13

Variation of the optimal Qpumping as a function of dn for different Qremoved∕(Tw−Tjets) and s

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Figure 14

Flowrate versus dn for different s

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Figure 9

Comparison of the effect of s∕dn on the Nusselt number in the present work and those of Pan and Webb (4) and Yonehara and Ito (7)

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