0
RESEARCH PAPERS: Combustion and Reactive Flows

A Numerical Investigation of Mixing Processes in a Novel Combustor Application

[+] Author and Article Information
Yeshayahou Levy1

Turbo and Jet Engine Laboratory, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200, Israel

Hui-Yuan Fan, Valery Sherbaum

Turbo and Jet Engine Laboratory, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200, Israel

1

To whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Heat Transfer 127(12), 1334-1343 (Feb 21, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2103090 History: Received February 20, 2003; Revised February 21, 2005

A mixing process in a staggered toothed-indented shaped channel was investigated. It was studied in two steps: (1) numerical simulations for different sizes of the boundary-contour were performed by using a CFD code; (2) these results were used for simulation-data modeling for prediction of mixing performances across the whole field of changing geometric and the aerodynamic stream parameters. Support vector machine (SVM) technique, known as a new type of self learning machine, was selected to carry out this stage. The suitability of this application method was demonstrated in comparison with a neural network (NN) method. The established modeling system was then applied to some further studies of the prototype mixer, including observations of the mixing performance in three special cases and performing optimizations of the mixing processes for two conflicting objectives and hereby obtaining the Pareto optimum sets.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Mixing domain and specifications

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Validation of the CFD code by some analytical results

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Variations of TPF and TPLF with the height h for some given values of the width w

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Variations of TPF and TPLF with the width w for some given values of the height h

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Variations of TPF and TPLF with the fresh-air velocity for given values of the height h and width w

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

The staggered area on the inlet section of the mixing domain

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Comparisons of the performances of SVMs and NNs for predicting the testing data in the 2-V modeling problem

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Comparisons of the performances of SVMs and NNs for predicting the testing data in the 3-V modeling problem

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Comparisons of the TPF and TPLF with the number of the vertical segments of the inlet boundary line in cases of fixed total length (V1∕V2=3)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

The variations of TPF and TPLF with the number of the vertical segments of the inlet boundary line in cases of fixed ratio of the height h to the width w(V1∕V2=3)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

The variations of TPF and TPLF with the number of the vertical segments of the inlet boundary line in cases of fixed height h(V1∕V2=3)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

The initial points and the results searched by DE after 1000 evolving generations for the 2-V optimization problem

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

The initial points and the results searched by DE after 1000 evolving generations for the 3-V optimization problem

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In