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RESEARCH PAPERS: Fuel Cells

A Review of Heat Transfer Issues in Hydrogen Storage Technologies

[+] Author and Article Information
Jinsong Zhang

Energy Center at Discovery Park and School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088

Timothy S. Fisher1

Energy Center at Discovery Park and School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088

P. Veeraraghavan Ramachandran

Energy Center at Discovery Park and Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2084

Jay P. Gore, Issam Mudawar

Energy Center at Discovery Park and School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2084

1

Corresponding author: tsfisher@purdue.edu; phone: 765-494-5627.

J. Heat Transfer 127(12), 1391-1399 (Aug 25, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2098875 History: Received September 30, 2004; Revised August 25, 2005

Significant heat transfer issues associated with four alternative hydrogen storage methods are identified and discussed, with particular emphasis on technologies for vehicle applications. For compressed hydrogen storage, efficient heat transfer during compression and intercooling decreases compression work. In addition, enhanced heat transfer inside the tank during the fueling process can minimize additional compression work. For liquid hydrogen storage, improved thermal insulation of cryogenic tanks can significantly reduce energy loss caused by liquid boil-off. For storage systems using metal hydrides, enhanced heat transfer is essential because of the low effective thermal conductivity of particle beds. Enhanced heat transfer is also necessary to ensure that both hydriding and dehydriding processes achieve completion and to prevent hydride bed meltdown. For hydrogen storage in the form of chemical hydrides, innovative vehicle cooling design will be needed to enable their acceptance.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Typical variation of thermal conductivity with layer density for a typical MLI with boundary temperatures of 294 and 78K, adapted from Ref. 42

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Heat transfer as a function of pressure for vacuum insulation, adapted from Ref. 42

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Temperature profile in a countercurrent hydrogen heat exchanger, adapted from Ref. 36

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Schematic of a patented metal-hydride hydrogen storage bed, adapted from Ref. 52

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