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TECHNICAL BRIEFS

Heat Conduction in Multiply Adjoined Anisotropic Media with Embedded Point Heat Sources

[+] Author and Article Information
Y. C. Shiah1

Department of Aeronautical Engineering,  Feng Chia University, 100 Wenhwa Road, Seatwen 407, Taichung, Taiwan, R.O.C.

Po-Wen Hwang, Ruey-Bin Yang

Department of Aeronautical Engineering,  Feng Chia University, 100 Wenhwa Road, Seatwen 407, Taichung, Taiwan, R.O.C.

1

Associate Professor, Tel: 886-4-2451-7250 ext. 3956, Fax: 886-4-2451-0862, e-mail: ycshiah@fcu.edu.tw

J. Heat Transfer 128(2), 207-214 (Jan 06, 2005) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2137765 History: Received June 06, 2004; Revised January 06, 2005

In this article the direct domain-mapping technique is applied in the boundary element method (BEM) to investigate the heat conduction in composites consisting of multiple anisotropic media with embedded point heat sources. By use of a linear coordinate transformation, the physical domain is mapped to an auxiliary plane for 2D or space for 3D, where the heat conduction is considered isotropic. However, the interfaces of adjoined materials with dissimilar properties will overlap or separate in the mapped plane or space. For the use of the subregioning technique in BEM to solve such problems, the thermal equilibrium condition for interfaces is developed to account for boundary distortions. In the mapped plane or space, not only the locations but also the strength of heat sources are transformed accordingly. After the problem is solved in the mapped plane or space, the obtained numerical solution is thereafter interpolated and transformed back to the one in the physical domain.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Direct domain mapping of a composite consisting of multiple anisotropic materials

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Figure 2

A square block embedded with a core column and its BEM meshes for Problem 1

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Figure 3

Variation of normalized temperature, T∕ΔT, along BC and AD

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Figure 4

Variation of normalized temperature gradients, dT∕dn∙L∕ΔT, along AB and CD

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Figure 5

Variation of normalized temperature, T∕ΔT, along the circumference of the core material

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Figure 6

A composite bar with concentrated heat sources

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Figure 7

Boundary meshes used for the BEM analysis for Example II

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Figure 8

Variation of normalized temperature, T∕ΔT, along the midline of interfaces for Example II

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Figure 9

A rectangular composite subjected to internal concentrated heat sources—Example III

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Figure 10

Variation of the normalized temperatures, T∕ΔT, along surfaces BC, AD, and RG

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Figure 11

Variation of the normalized temperature gradients, dT∕dn∙L∕ΔT, along surfaces AB, EF, and DC

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Figure 12

Variation of the normalized temperatures, T∕ΔT, along interface EF

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