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RESEARCH PAPERS: Combustion and Reactive Flows

Flame Radiation and Soot Emission From Partially Premixed Methane Counterflow Flames

[+] Author and Article Information
Hemant P. Mungekar1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109Hemant_Mungekar@amat.com

Arvind Atreya

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109aatreya@umich.edu

Although hotly debated, this is the commonly used value of the soot refractive index. However, the extinction data presented here can be easily scaled if a more reliable value of the soot refractive index is proposed in the future.

1

Corresponding author. Currently with Applied Materials, 3330 Scott Blvd., M/S 0681, Santa Clara, CA 95054.

J. Heat Transfer 128(4), 361-367 (Oct 23, 2005) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2165204 History: Received October 28, 2004; Revised October 23, 2005

Motivated by heat transfer and environmental concerns, a study of flame radiation and soot particulate emission is reported for partial premixing in low strain-rate (<20s1) methane counterflow flames. Temperature, OH concentration, and soot volume fraction distributions were measured along the stagnation streamline for progressive addition of oxygen to methane. These measurements along with an optically thin model for soot and gas radiation were used to study the effect of partial premixing on flame radiation and soot emission. It was found that with progressive partial premixing, the peak soot loading and the thickness of the soot zone first decreased and then increased, and while the gas radiation was enhanced, the gas radiative fraction (gas radiation per unit chemical energy release) showed a systematic decrease. The net radiative fraction (soot+gas), however, first decreased and then increased. A configuration with the soot zone spatially entrapped between the premixed and non-premixed reaction zones was experimentally found. This flame configuration has the potential to enhance radiative heat transfer while simultaneously reducing soot and NOx emissions.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Soot luminosity photographs

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Figure 3

(a) Measured temperature, OH and fv with computed locations of SP and major stable species, (b) flame radiation and energy release in non-premixed flame, Flame A*

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Figure 4

(a) Measured temperature, OH and fv with computed locations of SP and major stable species, (b) flame radiation and energy release in PP flame, Flame B

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Figure 5

(a) Measured temperature, OH and fv with computed locations of SP and major stable species, (b) flame radiation and energy release in PP flame, Flame C

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Figure 6

(a) Measured temperature, OH and fv with computed locations of SP and major stable species, (b) flame radiation and energy release in PP flame, Flame D

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Figure 7

Soot loading trends

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Figure 8

Computed trends for soot radiation, energy release, and radiation fraction

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Figure 1

Location of soot region in CFDF residing on (a) oxidizer side of SP, (b) fuel side of SP, and (c) interdependent regime partially premixed flame

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