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RESEARCH PAPERS: SPECIAL ISSUE ON BOILING AND INTERFACIAL PHENOMENA: Heat Transfer in Manufacturing

Numerical Study of the Heat Transfer Rate in a Helical Static Mixer

[+] Author and Article Information
Ramin K. Rahmani

Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606rkhrahmani@yahoo.com

Theo G. Keith

Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606tkeith@eng.utoledo.edu

Anahita Ayasoufi

Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606aayasoufi@yahoo.com

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J. Heat Transfer 128(8), 769-783 (Feb 13, 2006) (15 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2217749 History: Received February 13, 2005; Revised February 13, 2006

In chemical processing industries, heating, cooling, and other thermal processing of viscous fluids are an integral part of the unit operations. Static mixers are often used in continuous mixing, heat transfer, and chemical reactions applications. In spite of widespread usage, the flow physics of static mixers is not fully understood. For a given application, besides experimentation, the modern approach to resolve this is to use powerful computational fluid dynamics tools to study static mixer performance. This paper extends a previous study by the authors on an industrial helical static mixer and investigates heat transfer and mixing mechanisms within a helical static mixer. A three-dimensional finite volume simulation is used to study the performance of the mixer under both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. The turbulent flow cases were solved using kω model. The effects of different flow conditions on the performance of the mixer are studied. Also, the effects of different thermal boundary conditions on the heat transfer rate in static mixer are studied. Heat transfer rates for a flow in a pipe containing no mixer are compared to that with a helical static mixer.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

A six-element static mixer

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Figure 2

Comparison between the predicted pressure drop and the experimental data (Pa)

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Figure 3

Temperature at even numbered elements, Re=10(TW=318.15K)

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Figure 4

Temperature at even numbered elements, Re=100(TW=318.15K)

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Figure 5

Temperature at even numbered elements, Re=1000(TW=318.15K)

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Figure 6

Heat transfer coefficient in a pipe (Re=1, adiabatic BC)

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Figure 7

Heat transfer coefficient in a pipe (Re=100, adiabatic BC)

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Figure 8

Heat transfer coefficient in a pipe (Re=1000, adiabatic BC)

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Figure 9

Temperature contours, constant temperature BC, Re=100

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Figure 10

Temperature contours, constant temperature BC, Re=1000

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Figure 11

Temperature at even numbered elements, Re=3000(TW=368.15K)

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Figure 12

Heat transfer coefficient in a pipe (Re=3000, adiabatic BC)

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Figure 13

Temperature contours, Constant temperature BC, Re=3000

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Figure 14

Distribution function for laminar flow in a six-element static mixer (dt*=0.01)

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