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RESEARCH PAPERS: Heat Transfer Enhancement

Design Optimization of Size and Geometry of Vortex Promoter in a Two-Dimensional Channel

[+] Author and Article Information
Tunc Icoz

GE Global Research, Thermal Systems Laboratory, Niskayuna NY 12309

Yogesh Jaluria

 Rutgers University, Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, New Brunswick NJ 08901

J. Heat Transfer 128(10), 1081-1092 (Jul 08, 2006) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2345433 History: Received January 10, 2006; Revised July 08, 2006

Thermal management of electronic equipment is one of the major technical problems in the development of electronic systems that would meet increasing future demands for speed and reliability. It is necessary to design cooling systems for removing the heat dissipated by the electronic components efficiently and with minimal cost. Vortex promoters have important implications in cooling systems for electronic devices, since these are used to enhance heat transfer from the heating elements. In this paper, an application of dynamic data driven optimization methodology, which employs concurrent use of simulation and experiment, is presented for the design of the vortex promoter to maximize the heat removal rate from multiple protruding heat sources located in a channel, while keeping the pressure drop within reasonable limits. Concurrent use of computer simulation and experiment in real time is shown to be an effective tool for efficient engineering design and optimization. Numerical simulation can effectively be used for low flow rates and low heat inputs. However, with transition to oscillatory and turbulent flows at large values of these quantities, the problem becomes more involved and computational cost increases dramatically. Under these circumstances, experimental systems are used to determine the component temperatures for varying heat input and flow conditions. The design variables are taken as the Reynolds number and the shape and size of the vortex promoter. The problem is a multiobjective design optimization problem, where the objectives are maximizing the total heat transfer rate Q and minimizing the pressure drop ΔP. This multiobjective problem is converted to a single-objective problem by combining the two objective functions in the form of weighted sums.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic representation of the problem

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Figure 2

Experimental setup

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Figure 3

Geometries and orientations of the vortex promoters used in experiments

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Figure 4

Comparison of computed and published Strouhal numbers in channel, downstream of the vortex promoter, without any heat sources

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Figure 5

Schematic representation of DDDOM methodology

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Figure 6

Transient Nu for (a)hp∕H=0.12 first heat source, (b)hp∕H=0.12 second heat source, (c)hp∕H=0.235 first heat source, (d)hp∕H=0.235 second heat source, (e)hp∕H=0.47 first heat source, and (f)hp∕H=0.47 second heat source

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Figure 7

Power spectrum of axial velocity component downstream of the vortex promoter at (a)Re=600, (b)Re=900, (c)Re=1200, and (d)Re=1500

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Figure 8

Streamlines for hp∕H=0.235 at (a)Re=300, (b)Re=900 and (c)Re=1200

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Figure 9

Temperatures for hp∕H=0.235 at (a)Re=300, (b)Re=900, and (c)Re=1200

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Figure 10

Computed heat transfer rate as a function of Re and hp∕H(a) first heat source and (b) second heat source

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Figure 11

Measured heat transfer rates for vortex promoter of size hp∕H=0.12(a) first heat source and (b) second heat source

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Figure 12

Measured heat transfer rates for vortex promoter of size hp∕H=0.235(a) first heat source and (b) second heat source

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Figure 13

Measured heat transfer rates for vortex promoter of size hp∕H=0.47(a) first heat source and (b) second heat source

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Figure 14

The effect of vortex promoter size on the pressure drop

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Figure 15

Measure pressure drop as a function of Re for (a)hp∕H=0.12, (b)hp∕H=0.235, and (c)hp∕H=0.47

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Figure 16

Combined computational and experimental results for (a)Q1 and (b)Q2

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Figure 17

Combined computational and experimental results for ΔP

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Figure 18

Distribution of data points used to generate the responses

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Figure 19

Response surfaces of the heat transfer rates from (a) first heat source and (b) second heat source, for the square promoter

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Figure 20

Response surface of the pressure drop for the square promoter

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Figure 21

Optimal size of the square promoter with Re for various objective functions

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Figure 22

Response surfaces for the objective function F=W1Q1¯+W2Q2¯−W3ΔP¯(a)W1=W2=W3 and (b)W1=W2=W3∕2

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Figure 23

Responses of Q1 and Q2 for (a) square, (b) hexagonal, and (c) circular vortex promoter

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Figure 24

Response of ΔP for three promoter geometries

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