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RESEARCH PAPERS: Evaporation, Boiling, and Condensation

A Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Atmospheric Pool Boiling by the Coupled Map Lattice Method

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Gupta

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, U.P. 208016 India

P. S. Ghoshdastidar

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, U.P. 208016 Indiapsg@iitk.ac.in

J. Heat Transfer 128(11), 1149-1158 (May 07, 2006) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2352785 History: Received September 03, 2005; Revised May 07, 2006

In the present paper, the characteristic atmospheric pool boiling curve is qualitatively reproduced for water on a temperature controlled thin copper strip having comparable length and breadth by the coupled map lattice (CML) method using a three-dimensional boiling field model. The basic objective of the work is to improve the prediction of the critical heat flux (CHF) with respect to the 2D CML model of Ghoshdastidar (Ghoshdastidar, P. S., Kabelac, S., and Mohanty, A., 2004, “Numerical Modelling of Atmospheric Pool Boiling by the Coupled Map Lattice Method,” J. Mech. Eng. Sci., IMechE Part C, 218, pp. 195–205). The work models saturated pool boiling of water at 1bar on a large (much larger than the minimum wavelength of 2D Taylor waves) and thin horizontal copper strip. The pool height is 0.7mm, indicating thin film boiling. In the present model, it is assumed that boiling is governed by (a) nucleation from cavities on a heated surface, (b) thermal diffusion, (c) bubble rising motion and associated convection, (d) phase change and (e) Taylor instability. The changes with respect to the 2D model are primarily with respect to 3D modeling of thermal diffusion and 2D distribution of nucleating cavity sizes. The predicted CHF is 1.57MWm2 as compared to the actual value of 1.3 and 0.36MWm2 predicted by the 2D CML model of Ghoshdastidar (see above). It can be said that for the first time a coupled map lattice method which is essentially qualitative in nature has been able to predict the CHF of saturated pool boiling of water at 1bar very close to the actual value. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis shows that the model gives physically realistic and stable results.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

(a) Computational domain and lattices; (b) expanded view of an interior cubic lattice

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Figure 2

(a) Nucleation superheat distribution in the x‐z plane at j=10 of the pool; (b) nucleation superheat distribution in the x‐z plane at j=15 of the pool

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Figure 3

Values of η for k=2 evaporating (i,j,k) lattices

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Figure 4

Flow chart of the overall solution algorithm

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Figure 5

Comparison of saturated pool boiling curves for water at 1bar based on 2D and 3D CML models

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Figure 6

Comparison of the saturated pool boiling curve for water at 1bar predicted by the present 3D CML model and that produced in the experiment of Nukiyama (1)

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Figure 7

Variation of vapor fraction in the x‐z plane at j=10 and j=15 of the pool

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Figure 8

Effect of minimum cavity diameter (Dm) on the saturated pool boiling curve for water at 1bar

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Figure 9

Effect of the parameter β (in Eq. 2) on the saturated pool boiling curve for water at 1bar

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Figure 10

Effect of the parameter η (in Eqs. 16,17) on the saturated pool boiling curve for water at 1bar

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Figure 11

Effect of the parameter a (in Eqs. 18,19) on the saturated pool boiling curve for water at 1bar

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Figure 12

Effect of enhancement factor on the saturated pool boiling curve for water at 1bar

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