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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Energy Transfer to Optical Microcavities With Waveguides

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhixiong Guo1

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854guo@jove.rutgers.edu

Haiyong Quan

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 129(1), 44-52 (Jul 21, 2006) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2401197 History: Received February 06, 2006; Revised July 21, 2006

Micro/nanoscale radiation energy transfer is investigated in optical microcavity and waveguide coupling structures working on whispering-gallery mode optical resonances. The finite element method is employed for solving the Helmholtz equations that govern the energy transfer and time-harmonics electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation. The maximum element size concept is introduced for the numerically sensitive subdomains where local mesh refining is needed because of the presence of intensified EM fields. The results show that the energy storage capability of a resonant microcavity is predominantly determined by the cavity size. The stored energy in the 10μm diameter microcavity considered is several orders of magnitude larger than that in the 2μm diameter microcavity. The gap between a microcavity and its light-delivery waveguide has a substantial effect on the energy coupling from the waveguide to the microcavity and consequently influences significantly energy storage in the microcavity. An optimal gap is found for maximum energy storage and most efficient energy coupling. This optimal gap dimension depends not only on the configurations of the microcavity and waveguide, but also on the resonance wavelength. With increasing gap the quality factor increases exponentially and quickly saturates as the gap approaches to one wavelength involved. The submicron/nanoscale gap is crucial for generating quality resonances as well as for efficient energy transfer and coupling.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Sketch of an optical microcavity coupled with a light-delivery waveguide

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Figure 2

Finite element meshes for the simulation domains of (a) the 2μm diameter microdisk system and (b) the 10μm diameter microdisk system, respectively

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Figure 3

The relative error of stored energy versus the maximum element size used in the computations

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Figure 4

The stored energy versus the element number used in the computations

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Figure 5

The harmonic electric field distributions in the three optical microcavity systems: (a) the 2μm diameter microdisk system (λ=822.735nm, g=150nm), (b) the 5μm diameter microdisk system (λ=807.735nm, g=300nm), and (c) the 10μm diameter microdisk system (λ=801.1165nm, g=500nm)

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Figure 6

The time-averaged energy density distributions in the three optical microcavity systems: the 2μm diameter microdisk system (λ=822.735nm, g=150nm), (b) the 5μm diameter microdisk system (λ=807.735nm, g=300nm), and (c) the 10μm diameter microdisk system (λ=801.1165nm, g=500nm)

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Figure 7

The harmonic electric field distributions for the 10μm diameter microdisk system resonating at the resonance mode of 801nm with two different gap values: (a) 250nm gap and (b) 750nm gap

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Figure 8

The stored energy versus the gap variation: (a) the 10μm diameter microdisk system at two different resonance modes and (b) the 2μm diameter microdisk system at two different resonance modes

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Figure 9

The gap effects on the FWHM (unit: GHz) of the resonance band and the Q factor: (a) the 2μm diameter microdisk system (at 823nm resonance mode)and (b) the 10μm diameter microdisk system (at 801nm resonance mode)

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