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TECHNICAL BRIEFS

Analysis of Solid–Liquid Phase Change Under Pulsed Heating

[+] Author and Article Information
Shankar Krishnan, Jayathi Y. Murthy

Cooling Technologies Research Center, School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088

Suresh V. Garimella

Cooling Technologies Research Center, School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088sureshg@purdue.edu

J. Heat Transfer 129(3), 395-400 (Aug 14, 2006) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2430728 History: Received February 06, 2006; Revised August 14, 2006

Solid/liquid phase change occurring in a rectangular container with and without metal foams subjected to periodic pulsed heating is investigated. Natural convection in the melt is considered. Volume-averaged mass and momentum equations are employed, with the Brinkman–Forchheimer extension to Darcy’s law used to model the porous resistance. A local thermal nonequilibrium model, assuming equilibrium melting at the pore scale, is employed for energy transport through the metal foams and the interstitial phase change material (PCM). Separate volume-averaged energy equations for the foam and the PCM are written and are closed using a heat transfer coefficient. The enthalpy method is employed to account for phase change. The governing equations for the PCM without foam are derived from the porous medium equations. The governing equations are solved implicitly using a finite volume method on a fixed grid. The coupled effect of pulse width and natural convection in the melt is found to have a profound effect on the overall melting behavior. The influence of pulse width, Stefan number, and Rayleigh number on the temporal evolution of the melt front location and the melting rate for both the cases with and without metal foams is investigated.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic diagram of the problem under investigation

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Figure 2

Predicted temporal evolution of melt volume fraction for two different Rayleigh numbers (Ra=106,108), Ste=1, Pr=50, and τw=0.01

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Figure 3

Predicted wall Nusselt number for a Ra=108, Ste=1.0, Pr=50, and τw=0.01 at periodic steady state

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Figure 4

Temporal evolution of predicted melt volume fraction for two different Stefan numbers (0.1 and 1.0) and for Ra=108, Pr=50, and τw=0.01

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Figure 5

Predicted temporal evolution of the melt volume fraction for Ra=108, Ste=1.0, Pr=50, and two different pulse widths (τw=0.01 and 0.22)

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Figure 6

Predicted melt volume fraction for Ra=106, Pr=50, Da=10−2, Ste=1.0, and τw=0.002

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Figure 7

Predicted wall Nusselt number for Ra=106, Pr=50, Da=10−2, Ste=1.0, and τw=0.002

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Figure 8

Predicted melt volume fraction for Ra=106, Pr = 50, Da=10−2, Ste=1.0, and τw=0.008

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