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RESEARCH PAPERS: Combustion

CFD Study of Heat Transfer in a Spark-Ignition Engine Combustion Chamber

[+] Author and Article Information
A. R. Noori

Combustion and Heat Transfer Department, Iran-Khodro Powertrain Company (IPCO), Tehran, Irana̱noori@ip-co.com

M. Rashidi

Mechanical Engineering Department, Engineering College, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iranrashidi@shirazu.ac.ir

J. Heat Transfer 129(5), 609-616 (Aug 21, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2712474 History: Received January 12, 2005; Revised August 21, 2006

The objective of this study is the thermal investigation of a typical spark-ignition (SI) engine combustion chamber with particular focus in determination of the locations where the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient are highest. This subject is an important key for some design purposes especially thermal loading of the piston and cylinder head. To this end, CFD simulation using the KIVA-3V CFD code on a PC platform for flow, combustion, and heat transfer in a typical SI engine has been performed. Some results including the temporal variation of the area-averaged heat flux and heat transfer coefficient on the piston, combustion chamber, and cylinder wall are presented. Moreover, the temporal variation of the local heat transfer coefficient and heat flux along a centerline on the piston as well as a few locations on the combustion chamber wall are shown. The investigation reveals that during the combustion period, the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient vary substantially in space and time due to the transient nature of the flame propagation. For example, during the early stages of the flame impingement on the wall, the heat flux undergoes a rapid increase by as much as around 10 times the preimpingement level. In other words, the initial rise of the heat flux at any location is related to the time of the flame arrival at that location.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Combustion chamber, piston, and cylinder head of the PAYKAN engine. Photographs have been taken using a digital camera at the Iran-Khodro Powertrain Company (IPCO).

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Figure 3

Variation of in-cylinder pressure with crank angle based on operating conditions shown in Table 2 for four different mesh sizes

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Figure 4

Variation of in-cylinder temperature with crank angle based on operating conditions shown in Table 2 for four different mesh sizes

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Figure 5

Computational mesh with 105,000 cells at the BDC created for the CFD simulation of the PAYKAN engine

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Figure 6

A few locations on the combustion chamber surface (a) and piston (b) where the thermal characteristics are considered

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Figure 7

Spatial and temporal variation of heat transfer coefficient during the compression stroke and before flame initiation for the locations shown in Fig. 6

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Figure 12

Variation of heat flux with crank angle for the locations shown in Fig. 6

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Figure 13

Variation of heat transfer coefficient with crank angle for the locations shown in Fig. 6

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Figure 16

Distribution of heat flux on the piston during the flame propagation

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Figure 17

Distribution of the gas velocity vectors in the vicinity of the piston during the flame propagation

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Figure 18

Temporal variation of the gas temperature in the vicinity of the cylinder head for the locations shown in Fig. 6

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Figure 21

Temporal variation of the area-averaged heat flux on the piston, cylinder head, cylinder wall, and total combustion chamber

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Figure 22

Temporal variation of the area-averaged heat transfer coefficient on the piston, cylinder head, cylinder wall, and total combustion chamber

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Figure 24

Comparison of the local heat flux calculated using CFD simulation at locations P3 and P4 with the area-averaged heat flux calculated using Woschni’s correlation

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Figure 23

Comparison of the area-averaged heat flux variations predicted by CFD simulation and Woschni’s correlation

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Figure 19

Variation of heat flux with crank angle for the locations shown in Fig. 6

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Figure 10

Temporal variation of the average in-cylinder gas density as well as the local gas density in the vicinity of the piston for the locations shown in Fig. 6

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Figure 9

Temporal variation of the gas temperature in the vicinity of the piston for the locations shown in Fig. 6

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Figure 8

Distribution of the velocity and heat transfer coefficient in the vicinity of the piston at 30deg BTDC, before flame initiation

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Figure 2

A cross section of inlet port (a) and outlet port (b)

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Figure 20

Variation of heat transfer coefficient with crank angle for the locations shown in Fig. 6

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Figure 15

Distribution of the gas temperature in the vicinity of the piston during the flame propagation

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Figure 14

Spatial and temporal variation of heat flux during the flame propagation for the locations shown in Fig. 6

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Figure 11

Spatial and temporal variation of heat transfer coefficient during the flame propagation for the locations shown in Fig. 6

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