0
TECHNICAL PAPERS: Heat Exchangers

An Experimental Study of Shell-and-Tube Heat Exchangers With Continuous Helical Baffles

[+] Author and Article Information
B. Peng

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi, Xi’an 710049, Chinabottlepeng@hotmail.com

Q. W. Wang1

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi, Xi’an 710049, Chinawangqw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

C. Zhang

Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6G 5B9, Canada

G. N. Xie, L. Q. Luo, Q. Y. Chen, M. Zeng

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi, Xi’an 710049, China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 129(10), 1425-1431 (Jan 23, 2007) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2754878 History: Received May 09, 2006; Revised January 23, 2007

Two shell-and-tube heat exchangers (STHXs) using continuous helical baffles instead of segmental baffles used in conventional STHXs were proposed, designed, and tested in this study. The two proposed STHXs have the same tube bundle but different shell configurations. The flow pattern in the shell side of the heat exchanger with continuous helical baffles was forced to be rotational and helical due to the geometry of the continuous helical baffles, which results in a significant increase in heat transfer coefficient per unit pressure drop in the heat exchanger. Properly designed continuous helical baffles can reduce fouling in the shell side and prevent the flow-induced vibration as well. The performance of the proposed STHXs was studied experimentally in this work. The heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in the new STHXs were compared with those in the STHX with segmental baffles. The results indicate that the use of continuous helical baffles results in nearly 10% increase in heat transfer coefficient compared with that of conventional segmental baffles for the same shell-side pressure drop. Based on the experimental data, the nondimensional correlations for heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop were developed for the proposed continuous helical baffle heat exchangers with different shell configurations, which might be useful for industrial applications and further study of continuous helical baffle heat exchangers. This paper also presents a simple and feasible method to fabricate continuous helical baffles used for STHXs.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Sketch of the STHX with noncontinuous helical baffles

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Sketch of the tube bundle of the STHX with continuous helical baffles

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

One helical cycle

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Dies for drilling

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Tube bundle of the STHX with continuous helical baffles (for CS and CM): (a) end view and (b) side view

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Shell configurations of the STHXs: (a) Side-in-side-out shell for CS and (b) middle-in-middle-out shell for CM and SM

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Tube bundle of the STHX with segmental baffles (for SM): (a) end view and (b) side view

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Experiment setup

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Illustration of geometric parameters: (a) STHX with segmental baffles and (b) STHX with helical baffles

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Overall pressure drop versus volumetric flow rate for helical exchangers

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Heat transfer coefficient versus overall pressure drop

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Friction factor versus Reynolds number for CS

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Friction factor versus Reynolds number for CM

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Friction factor versus Reynolds number for SM

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Nusselt number versus Reynolds number for CS

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Nusselt number versus Reynolds number for CM

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Nusselt number versus Reynolds number for SM

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In