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RESEARCH PAPERS: Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer

Thermal Control Utilizing an Electrohydrodynamic Conduction Pump in a Two-Phase Loop With High Heat Flux Source

[+] Author and Article Information
Seong-II Jeong

Satellite Technology Research Center, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-701, Republic of Koreajeong05@gmail.com

Jeffrey Didion

Thermal Technology Development, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771Jeffrey.R.Didion@nasa.gov

J. Heat Transfer 129(11), 1576-1583 (Feb 05, 2007) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2759971 History: Received February 06, 2006; Revised February 05, 2007

The electric field applied in dielectric fluids causes an imbalance in the dissociation-recombination reaction generating free space charges. The generated charges are redistributed by the applied electric field, resulting in the heterocharge layers in the vicinity of the electrodes. Proper design of the electrodes generates net axial flow motion pumping the fluid. The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) conduction pump is a new device that pumps dielectric fluids utilizing heterocharge layers formed by imposition of electrostatic fields. This paper experimentally evaluates the performance of a two-phase (liquid-vapor) breadboard thermal control loop consisting of an EHD conduction pump, condenser, preheater, evaporator, transport lines, and reservoir (accumulator). This study is performed to address the feasibility of the EHD two-phase loop for thermal control of a laser equipment with high heat flux source. The generated pressure head and the maximum applicable heat flux are experimentally determined at various applied voltages and sink temperatures. Recovery from the evaporator dryout condition by increasing the applied voltage to the pump is also demonstrated. The performance of the EHD conduction pump in this study confirms that the EHD conduction pump can be used as a stand-alone system for high heat flux thermal control.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Illustration of EHD conduction pumping mechanism

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Figure 2

Picture and cross section of the high-voltage electrode of the EHD conduction pump

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Figure 3

Assembled EHD conduction pump (two pairs shown)

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Figure 4

Experimental setup of the test loop with the EHD conduction pump

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Figure 6

(a) Generated pressure and (b) current, as the applied voltage varies (2∕4∕6∕8∕10∕12∕14∕16∕8∕4kV) at ambient temperature

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Figure 7

Generated pressure and inlet and outlet temperature of the EHD pump at 10kV of the applied voltage

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Figure 8

Generated pressure and inlet and outlet temperature of the EHD pump at 10kV of the applied voltage as the sink temperature varies (20∕10∕0∕−10∕−20∕−10°C)

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Figure 9

Generated pressure and relaxation time as a function of temperature

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Figure 10

Generated pressure and mass flow rate as a function of the applied voltage

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Figure 11

Timeline of the generated pressure of the EHD pump, pressure drop across the EV, heat load on the EV, the applied voltage on the EHD pump, and the EV upper end section temperature (TC21) at 0°C sink temperature

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Figure 12

Pressure drop across EV and mass flow rate as a function of heat load

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Figure 13

Heat transfer coefficient along EV as a function of heat load

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Figure 14

Flow pattern map at 85W of heat load (q=202864.0W∕m2,G=193.1kg∕m2s)

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Figure 15

Critical heat flux and power consumption of the EHD pump as a function of the applied voltage at −20°C, 0°C, and 20°C of sink temperature

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Figure 16

Timeline of the generated pressure of the EHD pump, pressure drop across the EV, the applied voltage on the EHD pump, and the EV upper end section temperature at 0°C sink temperature

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Figure 17

Timeline of the generated pressure of the EHD pump, pressure drop across the EV, the applied voltage on the EHD pump, and the EV upper end section temperature at −10°C sink temperature

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