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Research Papers: Forced Convection

Parametric Numerical Study of Flow and Heat Transfer in Microchannels With Wavy Walls

[+] Author and Article Information
Liang Gong

School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an Shaanxi 710049, P.R. Chinalgong@mailst.xjtu.edu.cn

Krishna Kota

George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405krishna.kota@me.gatech.edu

Wenquan Tao

School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an Shaanxi 710049, P.R. Chinawqtao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Yogendra Joshi1

George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 771 Ferst Drive NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405yogendra.joshi@me.gatech.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 133(5), 051702 (Feb 04, 2011) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003284 History: Received August 22, 2010; Revised December 06, 2010; Published February 04, 2011; Online February 04, 2011

Wavy channels were investigated in this paper as a passive scheme to improve the heat transfer performance of laminar fluid flow as applied to microchannel heat sinks. Parametric study of three-dimensional laminar fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics in microsized wavy channels was performed by varying the wavy feature amplitude, wavelength, and aspect ratio for different Reynolds numbers between 50 and 150. Two different types of wavy channels were considered and their thermal performance for a constant heat flux of 47W/cm2 was compared. Based on the comparison with straight channels, it was found that wavy channels can provide improved overall thermal performance. In addition, it was observed that wavy channels with a configuration in which crests and troughs face each other alternately (serpentine channels) were found to show an edge in thermal performance over the configuration where crests and troughs directly face each other. The best configuration considered in this paper was found to provide an improvement of up to 55% in the overall performance compared to microchannels with straight walls and hence are attractive candidates for cooling of future high heat flux electronics.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of wavy channels

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Figure 2

Variation in (a) average Nusselt number and (b) pressure drop with amplitude

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Figure 3

(a) Velocity vectors for A=50 μm (top) and A=200 μm (bottom). (b) Spatial velocity contours for different wavelengths.

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Figure 4

(a) Temperature field for A=50 μm (top) and A=200 μm (bottom) and (b) local Nusselt number plot

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Figure 5

Variation in PF with A

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Figure 6

Variation in (a) average Nusselt number and (b) pressure drop with amplitude

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Figure 7

(a) Velocity vectors for A=50 μm (top) and A=150 μm (bottom). (b) Spatial velocity contours for different wavelengths

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Figure 8

Variation in PF with A

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Figure 9

(a) Temperature field for A=50 μm (top) and A=150 μm (bottom) and (b) local Nusselt number plot

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Figure 10

Variation in (a) average Nusselt number and (b) pressure drop with wavelength

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Figure 11

Spatial velocity contours for different wavelengths

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Figure 12

(a) Temperature field for λ=4 (top) and λ=1.33 (bottom) and (b) local Nusselt number plot

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Figure 13

Variation in PF with λ

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Figure 14

Variation in (a) average Nusselt number and (b) pressure drop with wavelength

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Figure 15

Spatial velocity contours for different wavelengths

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Figure 16

Variation in PF with λ

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Figure 17

(a) Temperature field for λ=4 (top) and λ=1.33 (bottom) and (b) local Nusselt number plot

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Figure 18

Variation in (a) average Nusselt number and (b) pressure drop with aspect ratio

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Figure 19

Velocity vectors for α=1 (top) and α=2.5 (bottom)

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Figure 20

(a) Temperature field for α=1 (top) and α=2.5 (bottom) and (b) local Nusselt number plot

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Figure 21

Variation in PF with α

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Figure 22

Variation in (a) average Nusselt number and (b) pressure drop with aspect ratio

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Figure 23

Variation in PF with α

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Figure 24

(a) Temperature field for α=1 (top) and α=1.67 (bottom) and (b) local Nusselt number plot

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