0
Technical Briefs

Mineral Fouling Control by Underwater Plasma Discharge in a Heat Exchanger

[+] Author and Article Information
Yong Yang

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104yy65@drexel.edu

Hyoungsup Kim

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104hk378@drexel.edu

Alexander Fridman

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104fridman@drexel.edu

Young I. Cho

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104choyi@drexel.edu

J. Heat Transfer 133(5), 054502 (Feb 01, 2011) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003116 History: Received June 26, 2010; Revised November 19, 2010; Published February 01, 2011; Online February 01, 2011

The excessive mineral contents in water circulation systems could cause severe fouling in heat transfer equipment. The present study investigated the effect of underwater pulsed spark discharges on the mitigation of mineral fouling in a concentric counterflow heat exchanger. Artificial hard water with calcium carbonate hardness of 250 mg/L was used with velocity ranging from 0.1 m/s to 0.5 m/s and zero blowdown. Fouling resistances decreased by 50–72% for the plasma treated cases compared with the values for no-treatment cases, indicating that the pulsed spark discharge could significantly mitigate the mineral fouling on the heat exchanger surface.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic of the present experimental setup

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Fouling resistances over time for no-treatment and plasma treated cases with a flow velocity of 0.1 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Photographic images of scales for (a) no-treatment and (b) plasma treatment cases at a flow velocity of 0.1 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Fouling resistances over time for no-treatment and plasma treated cases at a flow velocity of 0.5 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

SEM photographs of scales obtained for (a) no-treatment and (b) plasma treated cases at a flow velocity of 0.5 m/s

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Adhesion of scales obtained for no-treatment and plasma treated cases at a flow velocity of 0.5 m/s

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In