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Research Papers: Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer

Heat Transfer Augmentation of Parallel Flows by Means of Electric Conduction Phenomenon in Macro- and Microscales

[+] Author and Article Information
Miad Yazdani

Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer Enhancement Laboratory, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616myazdan1@iit.edu

Jamal Seyed-Yagoobi

Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer Enhancement Laboratory, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616yagoobi@iit.edu

J. Heat Transfer 132(6), 062402 (Apr 02, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000977 History: Received June 23, 2009; Revised December 09, 2009; Published April 02, 2010; Online April 02, 2010

Electrohydrodynamic conduction phenomenon takes advantage of the electrical Coulomb force exerted on a dielectric liquid generated by externally applied electric field and dissociated charges from electrolytes. The electric conduction phenomenon can be applied to enhance or control mass transport and heat transfer in both terrestrial and microgravity environments with advantages of simplicity and no degradation of fluid properties for isothermal as well as nonisothermal liquids. This paper numerically studies the heat transfer augmentation of externally driven macro- and microscale parallel flows by means of electric conduction phenomenon. The electric conduction is generated via electrode pairs embedded against the channel wall to mainly enhance the heat transfer and not necessarily to pump the liquid. Two cases of Poiseuille and Couette parallel flows are considered where for the former, a constant external pressure gradient is applied along the channel and for the latter, the channel wall moves with a constant velocity. The electric field and electric body force distributions along with the resultant velocity fields are presented. The heat transfer enhancements are illustrated under various operating conditions for both macro- and microscales.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of 3D representation of the 2D solution domain (not to scale). Couette flow is studied for two cases. Couette-a: top wall is moving and the lower wall with electrodes is fixed and Couette-b: top wall is stationary and the lower wall with the electrodes is moving.

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Figure 2

Dimensionless contours of electric field and electric field streamtraces for electrode pair No. 3 and for the case of Poiseuille flow; scale: macro

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Figure 3

Dimensionless contours of net charge density for electrode pair No. 3 and for the case of Poiseuille flow; scale: macro

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Figure 4

Dimensionless contours of electric body force and electric body force streamtraces for electrode pair No. 3 and for the case of Poiseuille flow; scale: macro

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Figure 5

The dimensionless (a) velocity and (b) temperature profiles at x∗=12.3 for the case of Poiseuille flow. For the velocity plot, the solid and dashed lines correspond to u∗ and v∗ profiles, respectively.

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Figure 6

EHD-induced pressure gain, Eq. 12, as a function of the input electric power, Eq. 11, for the case of Poiseuille flow

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Figure 7

(a) Local Nusselt number and (b) axially averaged Nusselt number for the case of Poiseuille flow in the absence and presence of electric conduction mechanism. The solid and dashed lines represent the Nusselt number and heat transfer enhancement, respectively.

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Figure 8

Average Nusselt number (solid lines) and enhancement level (dashed lines) as a function of Re for different ReEHD values and for the case of Poiseuille flow

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Figure 9

The dimensionless velocity profiles at x∗=12.3 for the cases of Couette-a and Couette-b flows. The solid lines represent the u∗ profile and the dashed lines are for the v∗ profile.

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Figure 10

EHD-induced pressure gain, Eq. 12, as a function of the input electric power, Eq. 11, for the case of Couette-a flow

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Figure 11

Average Nusselt number (solid lines) and enhancement level (dashed lines) as a function of Re for different ReEHD values and for the case of Couette-a flow (a) and Couette-b flow (b)

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