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Technical Briefs

Exergy Analysis of Condensation of a Binary Mixture With One Noncondensable Component in a Shell and Tube Condenser

[+] Author and Article Information
Y. Haseli

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1H 7K4, Canadayousef.haseli@mycampus.uoit.ca

I. Dincer1

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1H 7K4, Canadaibrahim.dincer@uoit.ca

G. F. Naterer

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON, L1H 7K4, Canadagreg.naterer@uoit.ca

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 130(8), 084504 (Jun 02, 2008) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2909610 History: Received May 11, 2007; Revised August 29, 2007; Published June 02, 2008

The exergy (second-law) efficiency is formulated for a condensation process in a shell and one-path tube exchanger for a fixed control volume. The exergy efficiency ηex is expressed as a function of the inlet and outlet temperatures and mass flow rates of the streams. This analysis is utilized to assess the trend of local exergy efficiency along the condensation path and evaluate its value for the entire condenser, i.e., overall exergy efficiency. The numerical results for an industrial condenser, with a steam-air mixture and cooling water as working fluids, indicate that ηex is significantly affected by the inlet cooling water and environment temperatures. Further investigation shows that other performance parameters, such as the upstream mixture temperature, air mass flow rate, and ratio of cooling water mass flow rate to upstream steam mass flow rate, do not have considerable effects on ηex. The investigations involve a dimensionless ratio of the temperature difference of the cooling water and environment to the temperature difference of condensation and the environment. Numerical results for various operational conditions enable us to accurately correlate both the local and overall exergy efficiency as linear functions of dimensionless temperature.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

An arbitrary control volume of the condenser, illustrating the inlet and outlet flows

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Figure 2

Variation of exergy efficiency with environment temperature along the condensation path at different inlet cooling water temperatures: (a) 10.5°C, (b) 15°C, and (c) 20°C

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Figure 3

Variation of exergy efficiency along the condensation path at different upstream steam-air mixture temperatures

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Figure 4

Effect of air mass flow rate on exergy efficiency along the condensation path and predicted outlet steam mass flow rates

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Figure 5

Effect of the ratio of cooling water mass flow rate to upstream steam mass flow rate Rm on exergy efficiency

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Figure 6

Dependence of the local exergy efficiency on dimensionless temperature defined in Eq. 13

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Figure 7

Variation of overall exergy efficiency with dimensionless temperature

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