0
Research Papers: Experimental Techniques

Experimental Study of a Curved Rotating Heat Pipe

[+] Author and Article Information
T. A. Jankowski1

Mechanical and Thermal Engineering Group (AET-1), Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J580, Los Alamos, NM 87545jankowski@lanl.gov

F. C. Prenger

Mechanical and Thermal Engineering Group (AET-1), Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J580, Los Alamos, NM 87545

A. Razani

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Mexico, MSC01 1150, Albuquerque, NM 87131

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 130(10), 101601 (Aug 08, 2008) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2953303 History: Received August 10, 2007; Revised March 13, 2008; Published August 08, 2008

A curved rotating heat pipe for use in motor and generator applications is studied experimentally. The heat pipe is built so that both the condenser and evaporator sections are parallel to the axis of rotation. The condenser section is close to the axis of rotation while the evaporator section can be placed in contact with off-axis heat sources in the rotating machine. The geometry is achieved by incorporating an S-shaped curve between the on-axis rotating condenser section and the off-axis revolving evaporator section. The curved rotating heat pipe allows for a direct coupling of the rotating condenser section to an on-axis stationary refrigeration system, while allowing the revolving evaporator section to intercept off-axis heat sources in the rotating machine. An experimental rotating heat pipe test apparatus was built and operated. The test data indicate that the working fluid continued to circulate, resulting in heat transfer with a high effective thermal conductivity, with the curved rotating heat pipe operating under the influence of centrifugal accelerations approaching 400g. Furthermore, the experimental results were used to validate a heat pipe thermal model that can be used in the design of rotating machines that rely on the curved rotating heat pipe as part of the thermal management system.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Heat pipes
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

The curved rotating heat pipe. The layout of the rotating heat pipe in (a) shows the on-axis rotating condenser section and the off-axis revolving evaporator section, while the cross-sectional view in (b) shows the annular gap wick structure.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

The experimental apparatus used to test the rotating heat pipes. A picture is shown in (a) and a solid model of the components mounted to the frame is shown in (b).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Stationary dryout tests with the heat pipes installed in the rotating test apparatus

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Low-speed dryout tests

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Example data file for a rotating test with a 150W heat load and a condenser temperature of 25°C

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Measured temperature difference across the evaporator liquid film for the rotating tests. All uncertainties are the same as the 38W case.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Conductance across the liquid film in the evaporator section of the rotating heat pipe. The 74W case gave the largest (dashed) error bar and the 198W case gave the smallest (solid) error bar when calculating the conductance.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Nusselt number for heat transfer across the evaporator film in the rotating heat pipe

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Comparing measured temperature difference across the evaporator liquid film to the numerical model. Model predictions are shown as lines and experimental data as points.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Comparing heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator. Data labeled (measured) were measured heat transfer coefficients in the experiments performed here, and data labeled (calculated) are calculated values from the heat pipe thermal model described in Sec. 3. The dashed error bars are for the 74W data and the 198W error bars are solid.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In