0
Research Papers: Conduction

On the Analysis of Short-Pulse Laser Heating of Metals Using the Dual Phase Lag Heat Conduction Model

[+] Author and Article Information
K. Ramadan

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mu’tah University, P.O. Box 7, Karak 61710, Jordanrkhalid@mutah.edu.jo

W. R. Tyfour

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mu’tah University, P.O. Box 7, Karak 61710, Jordantyfour@mutah.edu.jo

M. A. Al-Nimr

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid 22110, Jordanmalnimr@just.edu.jo

J. Heat Transfer 131(11), 111301 (Aug 19, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3153580 History: Received April 16, 2008; Revised May 01, 2009; Published August 19, 2009

Transient heat conduction in a thin metal film exposed to short-pulse laser heating is studied using the dual phase lag heat conduction model. The initial heat flux distribution in the film, resulting from the temporal distribution function of the laser pulse, together with the zero temperature gradients at the boundaries normally used in literature with the presumption that they are equivalent to negligible boundary heat losses is analyzed in detail in this paper. The analysis presented here shows that using zero temperature gradients at the boundaries within the framework of the dual phase lag heat conduction model does not guarantee negligible boundary heat losses unless the initial heat flux distribution is negligibly small. Depending on the value of the initial heat flux distribution, the presumed negligible heat losses from the boundaries can be even way larger than the heat flux at any location within the film during the picosecond laser heating process. Predictions of the reflectivity change of thin gold films due to a laser short heat pulse using the dual phase lag model with constant phase lags are found to deviate considerably from the experimental data. The dual phase lag model is found to overestimate the transient temperature in the thermalization stage of the laser heating process of metal films, although it is still superior to the parabolic and hyperbolic one-step models.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Problem geometry: a thin metal film exposed to a short laser pulse

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Variation in the normalized heat flux with time at different locations in gold film with the laser pulse given by Eq. 28

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Variation in the normalized heat flux with distance at different times with the laser pulse given by Eq. 28

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Temperature variation with time at different locations in gold film with the laser pulse given by Eq. 28

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Temporal Gaussian distribution of the laser pulses given by Eqs. 28,29,38,39,40

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Variation in the normalized heat flux with time at different locations in gold film with the laser pulse given by Eqs. 38,39

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Variation in the normalized heat flux with distance at different times with the laser pulse given by Eqs. 38,39

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Temperature variation with time at different locations in gold film with the laser pulse given by Eq. 28

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Normalized temperature change at the left surface of gold film (L=100 nm) using laser pulses given by Eqs. 28,38,39,40 together with experimental data

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Normalized temperature change at the left surface of gold film (L=200 nm) using laser pulses given by Eqs. 28,38,39,40 together with the experimental data

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Normalized temperature change at the left surface of gold film (L=100 nm) with zero boundary heat losses (Eqs. 38,40): a comparison between experimental data and predictions of the DPL model for τq=8.5 ps and a range of τT

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Normalized temperature change at the left surface of gold film (L=100 nm) with zero boundary heat losses (Eqs. 38,40): a comparison between experimental data and predictions of the DPL for τT=90 ps and a range of τq

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Normalized temperature change at the left surface of gold film (L=100 nm) with negligible boundary heat losses (Eqs. 38,39): a comparison between predictions of the DPL, parabolic, and hyperbolic models together with experimental data

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In