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Research Papers: Experimental Techniques

A Method for Determining the Heat Transfer Properties of Foam-Fins

[+] Author and Article Information
Robert J. Moffat

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305rmoffat@stanford.edu

John K. Eaton

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305eaton@vonkarman.stanford.edu

Andrew Onstad

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305aonstad@stanford.edu

J. Heat Transfer 131(1), 011603 (Oct 22, 2008) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2977599 History: Received October 30, 2007; Revised June 13, 2008; Published October 22, 2008

Metallic and graphitic open-cell foams are being used or proposed as extended surfaces (fins) in heat sinks for electronic cooling and compact heat exchangers for aircraft applications. Three parameters must be known to calculate the heat transfer performance of a foam-fin: the product hmAc* as a function of flow-rate (the convective conductance per unit volume), the product ksAk* (the effective conductive conductance as a fin), and Rbond (the effective thermal resistance between the foam and the surface to which it is attached). This paper describes a new test method, which, in conjunction with an older well established type of test, allows all three parameters to be measured using one specimen.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

A control volume for the porous fin analysis

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Figure 2

A semilog plot of (Tair,out−Tair,in) can be used to measure M if the inlet air is uniform

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Figure 3

The test section

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Figure 4

A typical test specimen mounted using 1mm of high conductivity cement

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Figure 5

Exit temperature distributions from a typical specimen—Cartesian coordinates

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Figure 6

Exit temperature distributions from a typical specimen—semilog coordinates

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Figure 7

The temperature distribution in a low-effectiveness foam-fin

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Figure 8

The temperature distribution in a high-effectiveness foam-fin

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