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Research Papers: Radiative Heat Transfer

Radiative Properties of Expanded Polystyrene Foams

[+] Author and Article Information
Coquard Rémi

Centre Thermique de Lyon (CETHIL), UMR CNRS 5008, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, INSA de Lyon, Bâtiment Sadi Carnot, 9, rue de la physique, 69621 Villeurbanne CEDEX, Franceremi.coquardl@insa-lyon.fr

Baillis Dominique

Centre Thermique de Lyon (CETHIL), UMR CNRS 5008, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, INSA de Lyon, Bâtiment Sadi Carnot, 9, rue de la physique, 69621 Villeurbanne CEDEX, France

Quenard Daniel

 Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment (CSTB), 24, rue Joseph FOURIER, 38400 Saint Martin d’Hères, Francequenard@cstb.fr

J. Heat Transfer 131(1), 012702 (Oct 22, 2008) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2994764 History: Received December 14, 2007; Revised April 08, 2008; Published October 22, 2008

Expanded polystyrene foams are one of the most widely used materials for a building’s thermal insulation. Owing to their very low density, a substantial proportion of the heat transfer is due to thermal radiation propagating through their porous structure. In order to envisage an optimization of their thermal performances, an accurate modeling of their radiative behavior is required. However, the previous studies on this subject used several drastic simplifications regarding their radiative behavior (optically thick material) or their porous morphology (homogeneous cellular material, dodecahedral cells). In this study, we propose a more accurate model based on a detailed representation of their complex morphology allowing us to predict their entire monochromatic radiative properties. We investigated the influence of the different structural parameters on these properties. We checked the validity of our model by comparing the spectral hemispherical reflectance and transmittance measured on slabs of foam samples with values predicted by our model. A good accordance was found globally.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

Illustration of the different shapes of cells: (a) cubic cell, (b) dodecahedral cell, and (c) tetrakaidecahedral cell

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Figure 3

Evolution of the extinction coefficient, scattering albedo (a) and scattering phase function (b) with the radiation wavelength for a dodecahedral cellular material with Dcell=200μm and various densities

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Figure 5

Variation of the global radiative properties with the cell diameter for EPS foams with εinterbead=6%, Dbead=4mm, and ρ=8.95kg∕m3 or ρ=14.0kg∕m3

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Figure 6

Variation of the global radiative properties with the interbead porosity for an EPS foam with Dbead=4mm, Dcell=200μm, and ρ=8.95kg∕m3 or ρ=14.5kg∕m3

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Figure 1

SEM photographs representing the porous morphology of EPS: (a) macroscopic structure and (b) cellular structure

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Figure 4

Variation of the global radiative properties with the density for an EPS foam with εinterbead=6% and Dbead=4mm

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Figure 7

Variation of the global radiative properties with the bead diameter for an EPS foam with εinterbead=6%, Dcell=200μm, and ρ=8.95kg∕m3 or ρ=14.5kg∕m3

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Figure 8

Comparison of the experimental and theoretical spectral transmittances and reflectances for sample No. 1 (slice thickness: 3mm)

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Figure 9

Comparison of the experimental and theoretical spectral transmittances and reflectances for sample No. 2 (slice thickness: 3mm)

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Figure 10

Comparison of the experimental and theoretical spectral transmittances and reflectances for sample No. 3 (slice thickness 2.5mm)

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