0
Research Papers: Conduction

Temperature Created by a Tilted Moving Heat Source: Heating Line and Cylinder

[+] Author and Article Information
Valerian Nemchinsky

 Keiser University, 1500 Northwest 49 Street, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309nemchinsky@bellsouth.net

J. Heat Transfer 133(2), 021301 (Nov 02, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002601 History: Received January 10, 2010; Revised July 28, 2010; Published November 02, 2010; Online November 02, 2010

Temperatures created by a moving tilted line and a moving tilted cylinder are considered. Analytical expressions for low Peclet (Pe1) and high Peclet (Pe1) numbers are obtained for the whole range of possible tilt angles. These expressions almost overlap: It is shown that these analytical expressions describe very well the results of numerical calculations at any Peclet numbers except for a very narrow range of Pe close to unity. A method of calculation of the cut shape (variation of the tilt angle inside the cut) is discussed.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Geometry used to calculate temperature in the case of 1D MHS (line), angle θ is the azimuth of the observation point

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

(a) Nondimensional temperature created by 1D MHS: tilt angle β=22.5 deg, θ=0; points are the numerical calculation of the integral (Eq. 4), solid line is the approximation Pe⪢1 (Eq. 15); dashed line is the approximation Pe⪡1 (Eq. 12). (b) Nondimensional temperature created by 1D MHS: tilt angle β=45 deg, θ=0; points are the numerical calculation of the integral (Eq. 4); solid line is the approximation Pe⪢1 (Eq. 15); dashed line is the approximation Pe⪡1 (Eq. 12).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Geometry used to calculate temperature in the case of 2D MHS (cylinder); observation point is by Δ ahead of the cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Ratio of F2D(Pe,0,0)/F2D(Pe,β,0) for different Peclet numbers; for Pe⪢1, this ratio should be proportional to cos β (formula 36); bold line is cos β

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

(a) Nondimensional temperature created by a vertical MHS in the case of no liquid layer separating MHS and solid metal (Δ=0); points are the numerical calculations of the integral (Eq. 19); lines are the approximations (Eqs. 24,34). (b) Nondimensional temperature created by a tilted MHS: tilt angle is 45 deg and thickness of the liquid layer separating MHS and solid metal is 20% of the cylinder radius (δ=0.2). Points are the numerical calculations of the integral (Eq. 19); lines are the approximations (Eqs. 24,34).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Relative gain in heat per unit plate thickness by tilting the MHS (ratio of the heat per unit plate thickness to the one of the vertical MHS)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Shape of a cut: distance of the front of the melting edge from the MHS center as a function of the cut depth; initial tilt of the cut β0=0 and Pe⪢1

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In