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Research Papers: Forced Convection

Large-Eddy Simulation of Turbulence-Radiation Interactions in a Turbulent Planar Channel Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Ankur Gupta, Daniel C. Haworth

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802

Michael F. Modest1

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802mfmodest@psu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 131(6), 061704 (Apr 13, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3085875 History: Received March 10, 2008; Revised November 07, 2008; Published April 13, 2009

Large-eddy simulation (LES) has been performed for planar turbulent channel flow between two infinite, parallel, stationary plates. The capabilities and limitations of the LES code in predicting correct turbulent velocity and passive temperature field statistics have been established through comparison to direct numerical simulation data from the literature for nonreacting cases. Mixing and chemical reaction (infinitely fast) between a fuel stream and an oxidizer stream have been simulated to generate large composition and temperature fluctuations in the flow; here the composition and temperature do not affect the hydrodynamics (one-way coupling). The radiative transfer equation is solved using a spherical harmonics (P1) method, and radiation properties correspond to a fictitious gray gas with a composition- and temperature-dependent Planck-mean absorption coefficient that mimics that of typical hydrocarbon-air combustion products. Simulations have been performed for different optical thicknesses. In the absence of chemical reactions, radiation significantly modifies the mean temperature profiles, but temperature fluctuations and turbulence-radiation interactions (TRI) are small, consistent with earlier findings. Chemical reaction enhances the composition and temperature fluctuations and, hence, the importance of TRI. Contributions to emission and absorption TRI have been isolated and quantified as a function of optical thickness.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Instantaneous temperature contours for (a) nonreacting flow and (b) reacting flow

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Figure 2

Computed mean and rms passive scalar profiles and their comparison with DNS of Debusschere and Rutland (33)

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Figure 3

Species mass fractions as a function of mixture fraction, ξ

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Figure 4

Computed mean temperature profiles with variations in optical thickness for the nonreacting case

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Figure 5

Computed mean temperature profiles with variations in optical thickness for the reacting case

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Figure 6

Computed rms temperature profiles with variations in optical thickness for the reacting case

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Figure 7

Temperature self-correlation for several optical thicknesses for the reacting case

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Figure 8

Correlation between κP and T4 for several optical thicknesses for the reacting case

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Figure 9

Absorption TRI for several optical thicknesses for the reacting case

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