0
Research Papers: Heat Transfer Enhancement

Experimental Study on Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop of Recuperative Heat Exchangers Using Carbon Foam

[+] Author and Article Information
Y. R. Lin, J. H. Du, W. Wu

Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2450

L. C. Chow1

Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2450lchow@mail.ucf.edu

W. Notardonato

Cryogenic Test Laboratory, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, FL 32899

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 132(9), 091902 (Jun 29, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001625 History: Received July 23, 2009; Revised April 02, 2010; Published June 29, 2010; Online June 29, 2010

This work focuses on the development of high-effectiveness recuperative heat exchangers using solid and corrugated carbon foam blocks. Characterization tests were conducted on heat transfer and pressure drop for a single carbon foam block with different sizes. Results show that carbon foam can be an effective medium for heat transfer enhancement, and a short length in the flow direction yields a high heat transfer coefficient. The corrugation can enhance heat transfer and reduce pressure drop at the same time. A recuperative heat exchanger with carbon foam, which consists of separate blocks of carbon foams packed between thin sheets of stainless steel, was designed. The hot and cold flow paths were arranged in counterflow in the recuperator. The heat exchanger was designed in a modular manner so that it can be scaled up for a larger heat transfer requirement or a higher overall effectiveness. The anisotropic property of carbon foam was exploited to achieve higher effectiveness for one pair of foam blocks. Experiments with four pairs of carbon foams were conducted to evaluate the performance of carbon foam used in the recuperative heat exchanger. Measurements were made for both solid and corrugated foams for comparison. With four pairs of carbon foam blocks, an overall effectiveness εtotal greater than 80% was achieved. This paper demonstrates an approach to reach an effectiveness εtotal of 98% by placing many pairs of carbon foams in series.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Heat transfer between one carbon foam pair

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Axial temperature distributions of hot and cold streams within recuperator

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Configuration of a recuperator with four pairs of carbon foams

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Schematic of experimental setup for evaluating recuperator performance

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Overall heat transfer coefficient versus air flow speed for heat exchanger (solid and corrugated foams)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

1×5 cm2 corrugated foam

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

The temperature variation in an assumed straight tube

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Heat transfer and pressure drop versus velocity for 1×5×1 cm3 solid and corrugated foams

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Schematic of heat exchanger

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

SEM picture of carbon foam

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Experimental setup of heat transfer and pressure drop of one foam block

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

IR image indicating carbon foam temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

(a) Heat transfer and (b) pressure drop versus velocity for 5×5×1 cm3 solid and corrugated foams

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Illustration of air flow in the 5×5 cm2 corrugated foam

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Comparison of the average measured effectiveness (solid and corrugated foams)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In