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Research Papers

A Depletion Strategy for an Active Bottom-Water Drive Reservoir Using Analytical and Numerical Models—Field Case Study

[+] Author and Article Information
Ibrahim Sami Nashawi1

Department of Petroleum Engineering, College of Engineering and Petroleum, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060, Kuwaitis.nashawi@ku.edu.kw

Ealian H. Al-Anzi

 Kuwait Oil Company, P.O. Box 9758, Ahmadi 61006, Kuwaiteanzi@hotmail.com

Yousef S. Hashem

Department of Petroleum Engineering, College of Engineering and Petroleum, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060, Kuwaityhashem@hotmail.com

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 131(10), 101008 (Jul 29, 2009) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3177385 History: Received August 04, 2008; Revised February 01, 2009; Published July 29, 2009

Water coning is one of the most serious problems encountered in active bottom-water drive reservoir. It increases the cost of production operations, reduces the efficiency of the depletion mechanism, and decreases the overall oil recovery. Therefore, preventive measures to curtail water coning damaging effects should be well delineated at the early stages of reservoir depletion. Production rate, mobility ratio, well completion design, and reservoir anisotropy are few of the major parameters influencing and promoting water coning. The objective of this paper is to develop a depletion strategy for an active bottom-water drive reservoir that would improve oil recovery, reduce water production due to coning, delay water breakthrough time, and pre-identify wells that are candidates to excessive water production. The proposed depletion strategy does not only take into consideration the reservoir conditions, but also the currently available surface production facilities and future development plan. Analytical methods are first used to obtain preliminary estimates of critical production rate and water breakthrough time, then comprehensive numerical investigation of the relevant parameters affecting water coning behavior is conducted using a single well 3D radial reservoir simulation model.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Reservoirs , Water
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Historical production rate from Well A

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Figure 2

Water/oil contact (WOC) tracking of Well A

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Figure 3

Critical production rate as calculated by Meyer and Garder (4) method

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Figure 4

Critical production rate as calculated by Kuo and DesBrisay (21) method

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Figure 5

Critical production rate as calculated by Chaney (5) method

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Figure 6

Critical production rate as calculated by Chierici (6) method

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Figure 7

Schematic illustration of the reservoir simulation model

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Figure 8

Oil and water relative permeability as a function of water saturation

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Figure 9

Historical oil production rate versus simulated reservoir pressure

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Figure 10

Historical water cut versus simulated water cut

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Figure 11

Historical water production rate versus simulated water production rate

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Figure 12

Historical cumulative water production versus simulated cumulative water production

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Figure 13

Historical oil, water, and total fluid production rates versus simulated oil, water, and total fluid production rates

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Figure 14

Historical cumulative oil, water, and total fluid production versus simulated cumulative water and total fluid production rates

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Figure 15

Historical gas production rate versus simulated gas production rate

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Figure 16

Historical cumulative gas production versus simulated cumulative gas production

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Figure 17

Cumulative oil and water production as a function of various fluid production rates

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Figure 18

Well life and water cut as a function of various fluid production rates

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