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RESEARCH PAPERS: Radiative Properties

A Narrow Band-Based Multiscale Multigroup Full-Spectrum k-Distribution Method for Radiative Transfer in Nonhomogeneous Gas-Soot Mixtures

[+] Author and Article Information
Gopalendu Pal

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802

Michael F. Modest1

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802mfmodest@psu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 132(2), 023307 (Dec 09, 2009) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000236 History: Received November 26, 2008; Revised April 10, 2009; Published December 09, 2009; Online December 09, 2009

The full-spectrum k-distribution (FSK) approach has become a promising method for radiative heat transfer calculations in strongly nongray participating media, due to its ability to achieve high accuracy at a tiny fraction of the line-by-line (LBL) computational cost. However, inhomogeneities in temperature, total pressure, and component mole fractions severely challenge the accuracy of the FSK approach. The objective of this paper is to develop a narrow band-based hybrid FSK model that is accurate for radiation calculations in combustion systems containing both molecular gases and nongray particles such as soot with strong temperature and mole fraction inhomogeneities. This method combines the advantages of the multigroup FSK method for temperature inhomogeneities in a single species, and the modified multiscale FSK method for concentration inhomogeneities in gas-soot mixtures. In this new method, each species is considered as one scale; the absorption coefficients within each narrow band of every gas scale are divided into M exclusive spectral groups, depending on their temperature dependence. Accurate and compact narrow band multigroup databases are constructed for combustion gases such as CO2 and H2O. Sample calculations are performed for a 1D medium and also for a 2D axisymmetric combustion flame. The narrow band-based hybrid method is observed to accurately predict heat transfer from extremely inhomogeneous gas-soot mixtures with/without wall emission, yielding close-to-LBL accuracy.

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Figures

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Figure 1

Nondimensional heat flux leaving an inhomogeneous slab at a total pressure of 1 bar with step changes in mole fraction: The left layer contains 20% CO2, 2% H2O, and no soot, and the right layer contains 2% CO2, 20% H2O, and 0.1 ppm soot; both layers are at a constant temperature of 1000 K

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Figure 2

Nondimensional heat flux leaving an inhomogeneous slab at a total pressure of 1 bar with step changes in temperature: left layer at 1500 K, and right layer at 500 K; both layers contain 20% CO2, 20% H2O, and 0.1 ppm soot

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Figure 3

Nondimensional heat flux leaving an inhomogeneous slab at a total pressure of 1 bar with step changes in temperature and mole fraction: The hot left layer contains 20% CO2, 2% H2O, and no soot at 1500 K, and the cold right layer contains 2% CO2, 20% H2O, and 0.1 ppm soot at 500 K

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Figure 4

Temperature and mole fraction distributions in numerically simulated KH87 flame, (a) temperature distribution, (b) mole fraction distribution of H2O and approximately CO2 (wherever there is little CO), (c) mole fraction distribution of CO, (d) mole fraction distribution of C2H4, and (e) distribution of soot volume fraction

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Figure 5

(a) Local radiative heat source using LBL method and relative error (compared with LBL) for heat source calculations using (b) the single-scale FSK method, (c) the modified MSFSK method, and (d) the two group narrow band-based MSMGFSK method

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