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RESEARCH PAPERS: Applications

Effect on Radiant Heat Transfer at the Surface of a Pool Fire Interacting With a Water Mist

[+] Author and Article Information
J. P. Garo1

Laboratoire de Combustion et de Détonique, University of Poitiers, ENSMA, 1 Avenue Clément Ader Téléport 2—BP 40109, 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cédex, Francegaro@lcd.ensma.fr

J. P. Vantelon

Laboratoire de Combustion et de Détonique, University of Poitiers, ENSMA, 1 Avenue Clément Ader Téléport 2—BP 40109, 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cédex, France

D. Lemonnier

Laboratoire d’Etudes Thermiques, University of Poitiers, ENSMA, 1 Avenue Clément Ader Téléport 2—BP 40109, 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cédex, France

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 132(2), 023503 (Dec 01, 2009) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000185 History: Received October 28, 2008; Revised April 09, 2009; Published December 01, 2009; Online December 01, 2009

It is well established that the use of water mist can be an attractive alternative to gaseous suppression agents to extinguish fires for specific scenarios. Among the main mechanisms, which act together to extinguish fires when using a water mist: heat extraction, oxygen displacement, and radiant heat attenuation, the last one has received the less attention, especially regarding the energy balance at the fuel surface and, therefore, the rate of generation of flammable vapors. The objective of this work is to analyze, on the one hand, the perturbing influence of a mist addition as an opposed flow to a small-scale liquid (heptane) pool fire structure, especially at its base, the more interesting zone regarding the mechanisms of flame stabilization and extinction and, on the other hand, the effect on the surface radiant heat feedback. Experiments conducted give an order of magnitude estimate in essential agreement with a radiation computation, based on the mappings, previously obtained, of the two major parameters: temperature and extinction coefficient, that determine the thermal radiation of the flame. The important information is the confirmation that radiation attenuation cannot be identified as a predominant mechanism of extinguishment.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Experimental device

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Figure 2

Evolution of the mass burning rate as a function of time

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Figure 3

Field of temperature at the base of the heptane pool fire (the line of temperature maximum is also indicated for reference) (a) before mist addition, and (b) during mist addition

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Figure 4

Field of monochromatic (λ=633 nm) absorption coefficient due to soot at the base of the heptane pool fire (the line of temperature maximum is also indicated for reference) (a) before mist addition, and (b) during mist addition

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Figure 5

Evolution of the radiant heat flux in depth as a function of the distance from the fuel surface (for three tests conducted in similar conditions without mist addition)

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Figure 6

Photograph of the flame during the vaporization-expansion phase

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Figure 7

Field of monochromatic (λ=633 nm) scattering coefficient due to water droplets at the base of the heptane pool fire

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Figure 8

Evolution of: (a) absorption coefficient without mist addition (due to soot particles), (b) total absorption coefficient with mist addition (due to soot particles and droplets), and (c) scattering coefficient with mist addition (due to droplets) as a function of wavelength at a discrete location in the flame (r=0,75 cm, z=9 cm)

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Figure 9

Measured and calculated radiant heat flux at the heptane surface as a function of radial position

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