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RESEARCH PAPERS: Applications

An Efficient Method for Radiative Heat Transfer Applied to a Turbulent Channel Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Atsushi Sakurai

Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering, Niigata University, Ikarashi 2-nocho 8050, Niigata 950-2181, Japansakurai@eng.niigata-u.ac.jp

Shigenao Maruyama

Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577, Japanmaruyama@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp

Koji Matsubara

Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering, Niigata University, Ikarashi 2-nocho 8050, Niigata 950-2181, Japanmatsu@eng.niigata-u.ac.jp

Takahiro Miura

Department of Mechanical and Production Engineering, Niigata University, Ikarashi 2-nocho 8050, Niigata 950-2181, Japanf07b100f@mail.cc.niigata-u.ac.jp

Masud Behnia

Dean of Graduate Studies, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, 2006, Australiam.behnia@usyd.edu.au

J. Heat Transfer 132(2), 023507 (Dec 09, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000240 History: Received December 15, 2008; Revised April 01, 2009; Published December 09, 2009; Online December 09, 2009

The purpose of this paper is to consider a possibility of the independent column approximation for solving the radiative heat fluxes in a 3D turbulent channel flow. This simulation method is the simplest extension of the plane-parallel radiative heat transfer. The test case of the temperature profile was obtained from the direct numerical simulation. We demonstrate the comparison between the 3D radiative transfer simulation and the independent column approximation with an inhomogeneous temperature field and optical properties. The above mentioned results show the trivial discrepancies between the 3D simulation and the independent column approximation. The required processing time for the independent column approximation is much faster than the 3D radiative transfer simulation due to the simple algorithm. Although the independent column simulation is restricted to simple configurations such as channel flow in this paper, wide application areas are expected due to the computational efficiency.

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Figures

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Figure 1

The schematic diagram demonstrating the mechanisms for the 3D simulation and the ICA is described. Gray squares represent participating media elements. Arrows represent photon trajectory. Dashed line shows the effect of the periodic horizontal boundary for ICA.

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Figure 2

Computational domain and coordinate system

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Figure 3

Instantaneous temperature field in turbulent channel flow

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Figure 4

Comparison between the exact solutions, the 3D simulation, and the ICA results for a 1D plane-parallel medium

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Figure 5

Nondimensional divergence of radiative heat flux distributions on the contour surface at T∗=0.5 in a homogeneous medium. (a) and (c) show the results from 3D radiative transfer simulations. (b) and (d) show the difference between the 3D and the ICA simulations in the case of τL=1 and τL=50.

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Figure 6

Plane-averaged nondimensional divergence of radiative heat flux distributions with a homogeneous medium

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Figure 7

Nondimensional divergence of radiative heat flux distributions with homogeneous medium along the horizontal line at y=δ and z=Lz/2

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Figure 8

Nondimensional divergence of radiative heat flux distributions on the contour surface at T∗=0.5 in an inhomogeneous medium. (a) and (c) show the results from 3D radiative transfer simulations. (b) and (d) show the difference between the 3D and the ICA simulations in the case of τL=1 and τL=50.

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Figure 9

Plane-averaged nondimensional divergence of radiative heat flux distributions with an inhomogeneous medium

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Figure 10

Nondimensional divergence of radiative heat flux distributions with an inhomogeneous medium along the horizontal line at y=δ and z=Lz/2

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