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Research Papers

Heat Transfer in Microchannels With Suspended Solid Particles: Lattice-Boltzmann Based Computations

[+] Author and Article Information
Reza H. Khiabani, Yogendra Joshi

G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332

Cyrus K. Aidun1

G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332cyrus.aidun@me.gatech.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 132(4), 041003 (Feb 17, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000860 History: Received July 23, 2007; Revised February 19, 2009; Published February 17, 2010; Online February 17, 2010

This paper presents computational results on the effect of fixed or suspended cylindrical solid particles on heat transfer in a channel flow. The computational method is based on the solution of the lattice-Boltzmann equation for the fluid flow, coupled with the energy equation for thermal transport and the Newtonian dynamic equations for direct simulation of suspended particle transport. The effects of Reynolds number, particle-to-channel size ratio, and the eccentricity of the particle on heat transfer from the channel walls for single and multi-particles are presented. The multi-particle flow condition represents a case with solid particles suspended in the cooling medium, such as in micro/nanofluids, to augment heat transfer. The results provide insight into the mechanism by which suspended particles can change the rate of heat transfer in a microchannel.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 8

Effect of Re on Nu (stationary particle); b=35%

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Figure 9

Effect of blockage ratio on Nu (stationary particle); Re=40

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Figure 10

Effect of Eccentricity on Nu (stationary particle); Re=40 and b=35%

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Figure 11

Nu distribution (multiple stationary particles); Re=40

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Figure 12

Nu distribution for particle moving with const. velocity; b=35%

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Figure 13

Nu distribution at different times (freely suspended particle); Re=45 and b=35%

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Figure 14

Effect of Re on Nu distribution; b=35%

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Figure 15

Effect of blockage ratio on Nu (suspended particle); Re=110

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Figure 16

Nu distributions for a fluid containing several suspended particles; Re=220 and b=6%

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Figure 7

Local Nu distribution along the channel wall; b=35%

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Figure 6

Streamlines and isotherms for (a) unblocked channel, a channel containing a (b) stationary, (c) moving with constant velocity, and (d) freely suspended particle

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Figure 5

Variation in average Nu with Re

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Figure 4

Snapshots of streamlines and isotherms around a hot particle for Re=110

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Figure 3

Streamlines and isotherms around a hot particle for (a) Re=5 and (b) Re=50

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Figure 2

Comparing (a) horizontal velocity, (b) vertical velocity, and (c) temperature profile for different lattice units

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Figure 1

Schematic of the physical domain

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