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Research Papers: Jets, Wakes, and Impingement Cooling

Development of a General Dynamic Pressure Based Single-Phase Spray Cooling Heat Transfer Correlation

[+] Author and Article Information
Bahman Abbasi

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742babbasi@umd.edu

Jungho Kim1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 133(5), 052201 (Jan 31, 2011) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002779 History: Received April 23, 2010; Revised September 29, 2010; Published January 31, 2011; Online January 31, 2011

One of the main challenges of spray cooling technology is the prediction of local and average heat transfer coefficients on the heater surface. It is hypothesized that the local heat transfer coefficient can be predicted from the local normal pressure produced by the spray. In this study, hollow cone, full cone, and flat fan sprays, operated at three standoff distances, five spray pressures, and two nozzle orientations, were used to identify the relation between the impingement pressure and the heat transfer coefficient in the single-phase regime. PF-5060, PAO-2, and PSF-3 were used as test fluids, resulting in Prandtl number variation between 12 and 76. A microheater array operated at constant temperature was used to measure the local heat flux. A separate test rig was used to make impingement pressure measurements for the same geometry and spray pressure. The heat flux data were then compared with the corresponding impingement pressure data to develop a pressure-based correlation for spray cooling heat transfer. The maximum deviation between the experimental data and prediction was within ±25%.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Photographs of the sprays produced by three nozzle types operating at 345 kPa (from right to left: hollow cone, full cone, and flat fan spray)

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Figure 2

Pressure measurement apparatus

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Figure 3

Schematic of the pressure plate and pressure tap geometry

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Figure 4

Photograph of the microheater array used to measure heat flux distribution

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Figure 5

Heat transfer measurement apparatus

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Figure 6

Pressure and heat transfer coefficient distribution for PF-5060 flat fan spray at a 45 deg orientation

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Figure 7

Pressure and heat transfer coefficient distribution for PSF-3 full cone spray at a 5 mm standoff distance

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Figure 8

Pressure and heat transfer coefficient distribution for PAO-2 hollow cone spray at a 5 mm standoff distance

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Figure 9

Radially averaged pressure and heat transfer coefficient for PSF-3 hollow cone spray at a 3 mm standoff distance

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Figure 10

Radially averaged pressure and heat transfer coefficient for PAO-2 hollow cone spray at a 5 mm standoff distance

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Figure 11

Linear fit on the average H values against Pr to determine the universal constants a and C in the correlation

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Figure 12

Pressure versus heat transfer for PF-5060 experimental data and the prediction from the correlation

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Figure 13

Pressure versus heat transfer for PSF-3 experimental data and the prediction from the correlation

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Figure 14

Pressure versus heat transfer for PAO-2 experimental data and the prediction from the correlation

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Figure 15

Measured versus predicted radially averaged heat transfer coefficients for hollow cone PF-5060 data

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Figure 16

Measured versus predicted radially averaged heat transfer coefficients for hollow cone PSF-3 data

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Figure 17

Measured versus predicted radially averaged heat transfer coefficients for hollow cone PAO-2 data

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Figure 18

Predicted versus overall average measured heat transfer coefficient for each test case

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Figure 19

Measured versus predicted values for PF-5060 full cone spray heat transfer for various correlations from the literature

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