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Research Papers: Heat Exchangers

Bejan’s Constructal Theory Analysis of Gas-Liquid Cooled Finned Modules

[+] Author and Article Information
Giulio Lorenzini1

Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze No. 181/A, 43124 Parma, Italygiulio.lorenzini@unipr.it

Simone Moretti

Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze No. 181/A, 43124 Parma, Italy

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 133(7), 071801 (Apr 06, 2011) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003556 History: Received November 15, 2010; Revised January 24, 2011; Published April 06, 2011; Online April 06, 2011

High performance heat exchangers represent nowadays the key of success to go on with the trend of miniaturizing electronic components as requested by the industry. This numerical study, based on Bejan’s Constructal theory, analyzes the thermal behavior of heat removing fin modules, comparing their performances when operating with different types of fluids. In particular, the simulations involve air and water (as representative of gases and liquids), to understand the actual benefits of employing a less heat conductive fluid involving smaller pressure losses or vice versa. The analysis parameters typical of a Constructal description (such as conductance or Overall Performance Coefficient) show that significantly improved performances may be achieved when using water, even if an unavoidable increase in pressure losses affects the liquid-refrigerated case. Considering the overall performance: if the parameter called Relevance tends to 0, air prevails; if it tends to 1, water prevails; if its value is about 0.5, water prevails in most of the case studies.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Fin subtended area A

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Figure 2

Example of heat exchanging module with Y fins

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Figure 3

Optimal module and duct characteristic dimensions

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Figure 4

Example of meshing (case θ=0.15)

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Figure 5

Dimensionless conductance q∗ as a function of Reynolds number Re

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Figure 6

Dimensionless pressure losses Δp∗ as a function of Reynolds number Re

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Figure 7

Example of velocity (a) and temperature (b) fields (θ=0.10; air cooling)

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Figure 8

Example of velocity (a) and temperature (b) fields (θ=0.10; water cooling)

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Figure 9

Example of velocity (a) and temperature (b) fields (θ=0.15; air cooling)

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Figure 10

Example of velocity (a) and temperature (b) fields (θ=0.15; water cooling)

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Figure 11

Example of velocity (a) and temperature (b) fields (θ=0.20; air cooling)

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Figure 12

Example of velocity (a) and temperature (b) fields (θ=0.20; water cooling)

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Figure 13

Example of velocity (a) and temperature (b) fields (θ=0.25; air cooling)

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Figure 14

Example of velocity (a) and temperature (b) fields (θ=0.25; water cooling)

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Figure 15

Overall Performance Coefficient P as a function of Relevance α

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Figure 16

Detail of Overall Performance Coefficient P with Relevance α<0.3

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Figure 17

Detail of Overall Performance Coefficient P with Relevance α>0.7

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