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Research Papers: Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer

Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of Subcooled Flow Boiling of Alumina Nanofluids in a Horizontal Microchannel

[+] Author and Article Information
Saeid Vafaei

School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, E1 4NS, London, UK

Dongsheng Wen

School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, E1 4NS, London, UKd.wen@qmul.ac.uk

J. Heat Transfer 132(10), 102404 (Jul 29, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001629 History: Received October 11, 2009; Revised April 01, 2010; Published July 29, 2010; Online July 29, 2010

This work investigates subcooled flow boiling of aqueous based alumina nanofluids in 510μm single microchannels with a focus on the effect of nanoparticles on the critical heat flux. The surface temperature distribution along the pipe, the inlet and outlet pressures and temperatures are measured simultaneously for different concentrations of alumina nanofluids and de-ionized water. To minimize the effect of nanoparticle depositions, all nanofluid experiments are performed on fresh microchannels. The experiment shows an increase of 51% in the critical heat flux under very low nanoparticle concentrations (0.1 vol %). Different burnout characteristics are observed between water and nanofluids, as well as different pressure and temperature fluctuations and flow pattern development during the stable boiling period. Detailed observations of the boiling surface show that nanoparticle deposition and a subsequent modification of the boiling surface are common features associated with nanofluids, which should be responsible for the different boiling behaviors of nanofluids.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of experimental setup

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Figure 2

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) picture of alumina nanoparticles

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Figure 3

Variation in the critical heat flux with mass flux for de-ionized water and 0.001–0.1 vol % alumina nanofluids

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Figure 4

Variation in pressure and heat power with time at a mass flux of 1629.62 kg/m2 s for 0.01 vol % alumina nanofluid

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Figure 5

Variation in temperature and heat power with time at a mass flux of 1629.62 kg/m2 s for 0.01 vol % alumina nanofluid

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Figure 6

Variation in pressure with time for pure water and different concentrations of alumina nanofluids at a mass flow rate of 1629.62 kg/m2 s and an average heat flux of 246.14 kW/m2

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Figure 7

Variation in inlet temperature of water and different concentrations of nanofluids at average heat flux of 246.14 kW/m2 and mass fluxes of (a) 651.84 kg/m2 s, (b) 896.29 kg/m2 s, (c) 1140.73 kg/m2 s, (d) 1385.18 kg/m2 s, and (e) 1629.62 kg/m2 s

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Figure 8

Test section of the stainless steel microchannel

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Figure 9

SEM pictures of the test section of stainless steel microchannel close to the outlet after experiments with (a) de-ionized water, (b) 0.001 vol % alumina, (c) 0.01 vol % alumina, and (d) 0.1 vol % alumina

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Figure 10

SEM pictures of the test section of stainless steel microchannel after experiment with 0.1 vol % alumina at the (a) inlet and (b) outlet of the microchannel

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