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Research Papers: Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer

Thermohydraulic Study of a Flat Plate Heat Pipe by Means of Confocal Microscopy: Application to a 2D Capillary Structure

[+] Author and Article Information
Stéphane Lips

 Université de Lyon, CNRS, INSA-Lyon, CETHIL, UMR 5008, F-69621, Villeurbanne, France, Université Lyon 1, F-69622, Francestephane.lips@insa-lyon.fr

Frédéric Lefèvre

 Université de Lyon, CNRS, INSA-Lyon, CETHIL, UMR 5008, F-69621, Villeurbanne, France, Université Lyon 1, F-69622, Francefrederic.lefevre@insa-lyon.fr

Jocelyn Bonjour

 Université de Lyon, CNRS, INSA-Lyon, CETHIL, UMR 5008, F-69621, Villeurbanne, France, Université Lyon 1, F-69622, Francejocelyn.bonjour@insa-lyon.fr

J. Heat Transfer 132(11), 112901 (Aug 13, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001930 History: Received December 10, 2009; Revised April 28, 2010; Published August 13, 2010; Online August 13, 2010

Thermal and hydrodynamic experimental results of a flat plate heat pipe (FPHP) are presented. The capillary structure is made of crossed grooves machined in a copper plate. The shape of the liquid-vapor interface in this type of capillary structure—that can also be viewed as an array of posts—is studied theoretically and experimentally. A confocal microscope is used to visualize the liquid-vapor interface and thus the capillary pressure field in the system. These hydrodynamic measurements, coupled to temperature measurements on the FPHP wall, are used to estimate the permeability and the equivalent thermal conductivity of the capillary structure filled with methanol or FC72. These parameters are obtained from a comparison between the experimental data and an analytical model. Finally, the model is used to compare the draining capability of crossed grooves with that of longitudinal grooves.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the capillary structure

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Figure 11

Thermal resistance of the FPHP (q=6 W cm−2;Tcond=40°C)

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Figure 12

Temperature field in the FPHP (methanol: fr=12% and Tcond=40°C)

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Figure 13

Temperature field in the FPHP (FC72: fr=12% and Tcond=40°C)

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Figure 14

Capillary pressure for the FPHP filled with FC72

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Figure 15

Measured and calculated temperatures along line y=0 mm (methanol)

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Figure 16

Measured and calculated temperatures along line y=0 mm (FC72)

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Figure 17

Capillary pressure for the FPHP filled with FC72 (q=2 W/cm2)

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Figure 18

Capillary pressure for the FPHP filled with FC72 (q=4 W/cm2)

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Figure 19

Numerical comparison between 1D and 2D capillary structures: (a) Liquid velocity field for crossed grooves and (b) liquid velocity field for longitudinal grooves

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Figure 20

Capillary pressure along line y=0 mm

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Figure 4

Shape of the liquid-vapor interface: (a) H=1700 m−1 and (b) H=2000 m−1

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Figure 5

Maximum surface curvature in crossed grooves and longitudinal grooves

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Figure 6

Experimental visualization of the liquid vapor-interface in crossed grooves (dimensions in m)

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Figure 2

Thermistor location on the copper plate

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Figure 3

Scheme of the variable step-size

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Figure 7

Visualization of the shape of the posts by confocal microscopy

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Figure 8

Correction of the inclination angle of the FPHP

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Figure 9

Comparison between experimental and theoretical results

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Figure 10

Temperature measurements in the FPHP for different filling ratio (q=6 W cm−2;  Tcond=40°C)

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