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Research Papers: Jets, Wakes, and Impingement Cooling

Experimental Investigation on the Heat Transfer of a Leading Edge Impingement Cooling System for Low Pressure Turbine Vanes

[+] Author and Article Information
Pedro de la Calzada

 ITP, Industria de Turbopropulsores S.A., Avda Castilla 2, San Fernando de Henares, 28830 Madrid, Spainpedro.delacalzada@itp.es

Jose Javier Alvarez

 ITP, Industria de Turbopropulsores S.A., Avda Castilla 2, San Fernando de Henares, 28830 Madrid, Spainjosejavier.alvarez@itp.es

J. Heat Transfer 132(12), 122202 (Sep 21, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002206 History: Received April 23, 2010; Revised July 02, 2010; Published September 21, 2010; Online September 21, 2010

Impingement cooling through jet holes is a very attractive cooling system for heat rejection at high heat loaded areas as the leading edge of turbine vanes. Although some correlations and tools are available to dimension such systems, the variety and complexity of the flow features present in those systems still require experimental validation of real engine designs. Among the experimental techniques possible to be used, transient liquid crystal method offers good resolution as well as sufficient accuracy. Under this investigation, an impingement cooling system for the leading edge of a contrarotating power turbine (PT) representative of a small turboshaft engine was investigated experimentally. The PT vane features a very thin leading edge with high curvature and side channels rapidly turning backward. Constraints on cooling flow consumption and distribution led to a leading edge configuration with two rows of staggered jets. This particular configuration was experimentally investigated for three different Reynolds numbers around the design point by using a transient liquid crystal technique, which allows the measurement of surface distribution of heat transfer coefficient at the area of interest. Heat transfer results are presented in terms of surface distributions, impingement rows stagnation line local distributions, streamwise distributions along planes over the impingement stagnation points, span averaged streamwise local distributions, and surface averaged values. These results are then compared with available correlations from existing literature showing good matching for both maximum and averaged values. The results are also used as baseline data to discuss some of the flow features that can have effect on the heat transfer on this particular configuration.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Real engine NGV geometry (detail of insert tube LE impingement orifices)

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Figure 2

Impingement and instrumentation layout scheme

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Figure 3

Impingement geometry scheme

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Figure 4

Test rig schematic layout

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Figure 5

Typical temperature trajectories

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Figure 6

Design point Nu distribution (3D view)

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Figure 7

PS row centerline Nu distribution

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Figure 8

SS row centerline Nu distribution

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Figure 9

PS and SS row centerlines

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Figure 10

Design point Nu distribution (flat view)

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Figure 11

SS up streamwise local Nu distribution

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Figure 12

SS down streamwise local Nu distribution

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Figure 13

PS up streamwise local Nu distribution

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Figure 14

PS down streamwise local Nu distribution

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Figure 15

Local span averaged Nu distribution

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Figure 16

Row averaged Nu versus Re

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