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Research Papers: Conduction

Heat Transfer in Thin Multilayered Plates—Part II: Applications to the Composite Patch Repair Technique

[+] Author and Article Information
T. K. Papathanasiou1

Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, School of Applied Mathematics and Physical Sciences, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytechniou Street, Zografou Campus, 15773 Athens, Greecethpapath@lycos.com

S. I. Markolefas

Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, School of Applied Mathematics and Physical Sciences, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytechniou Street, Zografou Campus, 15773 Athens, Greecemarkos34@gmail.com

S. P. Filopoulos

Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, School of Applied Mathematics and Physical Sciences, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytechniou Street, Zografou Campus, 15773 Athens, Greecesfilop@gmail.com

G. J. Tsamasphyros

Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, School of Applied Mathematics and Physical Sciences, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytechniou Street, Zografou Campus, 15773 Athens, Greecetsamasph@central.ntua.gr

1

Corresponding author. Present address: Department of Mechanics, 9 Iroon Polytechniou St., Zografou Campus, Athens 15773, Greece.

J. Heat Transfer 133(2), 021303 (Nov 02, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002631 History: Received July 23, 2009; Revised September 23, 2010; Published November 02, 2010; Online November 02, 2010

This second part of our contribution entitled, “Heat Transfer in Thin Multilayered Plates,” refers to the modeling of an advanced repair technique, known as the composite patch repair (CPR). Thermal analysis of this particular application is highly complicated due to the geometry of the domains and the fact that many different materials participate in the implementation. In this paper, we take advantage of the fact that both the composite patch and the damaged plate to be repaired are of very small thickness. In that way, the whole domain may be treated as a thin multilayer area of extended surface. These properties make the thermal analysis of CPR an ideal field for using the method presented in the previous part of our analysis.

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Figures

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Figure 10

Zoom of Fig. 9 at the area of the repair

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Figure 9

Temperature distribution along the radius of the repair

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Figure 8

Axially symmetric repair geometry

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Figure 7

Time-degree of cure profile during the plateau stage for the point of the patch with the lowest temperature

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Figure 6

Zoom of Fig. 5 at the area of the repair (LB=0.125 m)

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Figure 5

Temperature distribution for example 2 (LB=0.125 m)

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Figure 4

Zoom of Fig. 3 at the area of the repair (LB=0.125 m)

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Figure 3

Temperature distribution for example 1 (LB=0.125 m)

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Figure 2

Composite patch repair configuration (Cartesian coordinates)

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Figure 1

Typical curing cycle for composite patch repair

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