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Research Papers

Theoretical Analysis of Microwave Heating of Dielectric Materials Filled in a Rectangular Waveguide With Various Resonator Distances

[+] Author and Article Information
Phadungsak Rattanadecho

Research Center of Microwave Utilization in Engineering (RCME), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Thammasat University (Rangsit Campus), Pathumthani 12120, Thailandratphadu@engr.tu.ac.th

Waraporn Klinbun

Research Center of Microwave Utilization in Engineering (RCME), Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Thammasat University (Rangsit Campus), Pathumthani 12120, Thailand

J. Heat Transfer 133(3), 031008 (Nov 16, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002628 History: Received September 14, 2010; Revised September 26, 2010; Published November 16, 2010; Online November 16, 2010

This paper proposes mathematical models of the microwave heating process of dielectric materials filled in a rectangular waveguide with a resonator. A microwave system supplies a monochromatic wave in a fundamental mode (TE10 mode). A convection exchange at the upper surface of the sample is considered. The effects of resonator distance and operating frequency on distributions of electromagnetic fields inside the waveguide, temperature profile, and flow pattern within the sample are investigated. The finite-difference time-domain method is used to determine the electromagnetic field distribution in a microwave cavity by solving the transient Maxwell equations. The finite control volume method based on the SIMPLE algorithm is used to predict the heat transfer and fluid flow model. Two dielectric materials, saturated porous medium and water, are chosen to display microwave heating phenomena. The simulation results agree well with the experimental data. Based on the results obtained, the inserted resonator has a strong effect on the uniformity of temperature distributions, depending on the penetration depth of microwave. The optimum distances of the resonator depend greatly on the operating frequencies.

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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of microwave system

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Figure 2

Comparison of numerical solutions with experimental results of temperature profile: (a) along x-axis and (b) along z-axis

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Figure 3

Distribution of electric field within saturated packed beds filled the guide for various microwave frequencies at t=60 s: (a) 1.5 GHz, (b) 2.45 GHz, and (c) 5.8 GHz

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Figure 4

Temperature profile along z-axis within saturated packed beds filled the guide for various microwave frequencies at t=60 s: (a) 1.5 GHz, (b) 2.45 GHz, and (c) 5.8 GHz

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Figure 5

Temperature contour within packed beds at 60 s: (a) 1.5 GHz, 0 mm; (b) 2.45 GHz, 100 mm; and (c) 5.8 GHz, 200 mm

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Figure 6

Velocity field within packed beds at 60 s: (a) 1.5 GHz, 0 mm; (b) 2.45 GHz, 100 mm; and (c) 5.8 GHz, 200 mm (vector length (relative): 35,900,000 grid units/magnitude)

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Figure 7

Distribution of electric field within water filled the guide for various microwave frequencies at t=60 s: (a) 1.5 GHz, (b) 2.45 GHz, and (c) 5.8 GHz

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Figure 8

Temperature profiles within water layer at 60 s: (a) 1.5 GHz, (b) 2.45 GHz, and (c) 5.8 GHz

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Figure 9

Temperature contour within water layer at 60 s: (a) 1.5 GHz, 0 mm; (b) 2.45 GHz, 0 mm; and (c) 5.8 GHz, 200 mm

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Figure 10

Velocity field within water layer at 60 s: (a) 1.5 GHz, 0 mm; (b) 2.45 GHz, 0 mm; and (c) 5.8 GHz, 200 mm (vector length (relative): 2500 grid units/magnitude)

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