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Research Papers: Experimental Techniques

A New Technique to Determine Convection Coefficients With Flow Through Particle Beds

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiaodong Nie

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9, Canadarachel.nie@usask.ca

Richard Evitts

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9, Canadarichard.evitts@usask.ca

Robert Besant

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9, Canadabob.besant@usask.ca

John Bolster

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9, Canadajcb803@mail.usask.ca

J. Heat Transfer 133(4), 041601 (Jan 11, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002945 History: Received January 11, 2010; Revised September 22, 2010; Published January 11, 2011; Online January 11, 2011

A new method for determining the heat transfer coefficient for air flowing steadily through beds of particles is presented. In this technique, a step change in the inlet air temperature is applied to a small test bed and temperature distributions in the bed and at the air outlet are sampled over a short time period. The convective heat transfer coefficient is determined using data from the convective heat transfer process in the bed where the analysis includes the partial differential equation that describes the transient energy storage in the particles within the bed. The analysis is performed for a short time duration when the temperature distribution in the particle bed is almost linear along the axis of the bed. This time period permits the most accurate determination of the heat transfer coefficient using the data. Using beds of spherical particles a new correlation is developed for the Nusselt number versus the Reynolds number (5<Redh<280) and includes the uncertainty bounds. This new correlation compares well with correlations developed by some other researchers for similar spherical particle beds.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic diagram of the test cell

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Figure 2

Schematic diagram of the conditioning processes for the inlet air and data acquisition system for the transient heat storage of the solid particle bed

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Figure 3

Transient air temperature at the inlet and outlet and the solid steel particle bed (dp=2.5 mm) temperature at three axial positions of the bed subject to 1.48 m/s air flow speed at the inlet

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Figure 4

Solid steel particle bed (dp=2.5 mm) temperature distribution at different times along the axial position of particle bed subject to 1.48 m/s air flow speed at the inlet

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Figure 5

Experimental data and correlation of Nusselt number versus Reynolds number for beds of spherical glass, steel, or lead particles

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Figure 6

Comparison of the correlations for Nudh/Pr1/3 vs Redh

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