0
THERMAL ISSUES IN EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES

Cooling Characteristics of Regenerative Magnetic Refrigeration With Particle-Packed Bed

[+] Author and Article Information
Tsuyoshi Kawanami, Shigeki Hirano

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501, Japan

Masahiro Ikegawa

Division of Human Mechanical Systems and Design, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13-W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628, Japan

Koji Fumoto

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kushiro National College of Technology, Otanoshike-Nishi 2-32-1, Kushiro 084-0916, Japan

J. Heat Transfer 133(6), 060903 (Mar 04, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003450 History: Received November 28, 2009; Revised November 11, 2010; Published March 04, 2011; Online March 04, 2011

The aim of our study was to elucidate the fundamental cooling characteristics and to improve the cooling characteristics of a room-temperature magnetic refrigerator operated under an active magnetic regenerator (AMR) cycle. The AMR refrigeration cycle, which includes a thermal storage process and a regeneration process, is used to realize a practical magnetic refrigerator operating near room-temperature. The basic components of the target AMR system are a magnetic circuit, test section, fluid-displacing device, and associated instrumentation. Spherical gadolinium particles are packed in the test section as the magnetic working substance, and air and water are used as heat transfer fluids. The cooling characteristics of the target AMR system under various operating conditions are investigated. The results show that the AMR cycle is very effective in improving the cooling performance of the room-temperature magnetic refrigerator.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Adiabatic temperature change of gadolinium, the data were measured for 2.0 T (closed diamonds) and 1.0 T (open circles)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Transition of temperature distribution in a test section with AMR: (a) magnetization process, (b) fluid flow process, (c) demagnetization process, and (d) fluid flow process

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Operation sequence for the present AMR cycle

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Schematic diagram of the experimental setup: (1) test section as the AMR particle-packing bed, (2) 2.0 T Halbach magnetic circuit with a 20 mm gap distance, (3) fluid displacer that drives the heat transfer fluid reciprocately, (4) electric linear-motion slider No. 1, (5) electric linear-motion slider No. 2, (6) platinum resistance temperature detector, (7) data acquisition unit, and (8) personal computer

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Distribution of magnetic field induction in-between magnets

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Dimension of the test section and installation of the temperature detectors

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Experimental temperature distributions at 2.0 T with water as the heat transfer fluid for V∗=0.43 and F∗=0.87 s−1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Distribution of temperature difference of water-based AMR as a function of relative flow volume and magnetic flux for F∗=0.21

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Distribution of temperature difference of water-based AMR as a function of relative volumetric flow rate and magnetic flux for V∗=0.87

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Relationship between the temperature difference and the operating conditions for 2.0 T magnetic flux: water-based AMR

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Experimental temperature distributions at 2.0 T with air as the heat transfer fluid for V∗=350 and F∗=88 s−1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Relationship between the temperature difference and the operating conditions for 2.0 T magnetic flux: air-based AMR

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Details of the simulation model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Analytical temperature distributions at 2.0 T with water as the heat transfer fluid for V∗=0.43 and F∗=0.87 s−1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Distribution of maximum temperature difference at 2.0 T of the water-based AMR form the present simulation as a function of relative volumetric flow rate for V∗=0.43, the data were obtained from analysis (closed circles) and experiment (open diamonds)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Distribution of maximum temperature difference at 2.0 T of the water-based AMR form the present simulation as a function of relative flow volume for F∗=1.3, the data were obtained from analysis (closed circles) and experiment (open diamonds)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Temperature change at 2.0 T for AMR refrigeration cycle with air as the heat transfer fluid for V∗=350 and F∗=88 s−1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 18

Distribution of maximum difference at 2.0 T of air-based AMR as a function of the relative flow volume for F∗=88 s−1, the data were obtained from analysis (closed circles) and experiment (open diamonds)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 19

Distribution of maximum temperature difference at 2.0 T of air-based AMR as a function of the relative volumetric flow rate for V∗=438, the data were obtained from analysis (closed circles) and experiment (open diamonds)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In